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Nick Bennett 50 min

From Word of Mouth to Movement: A Framework To Gain Trust, Build Community, and Skyrocket Your Conversion Rates


Discover a proven framework in our upcoming session with Pablo Gonzalez that transforms word of mouth into a powerful community movement, dramatically enhancing trust and skyrocketing conversion rates.



0:00

one.

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Where you gonna what's up? What's up, everyone? What's

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up? Oh, exciting. March 27, 2024. Thanks for coming live. We

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got an energetic audience Pablo for this one.

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Energetic. If you're listening to the recording and I have

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questions and are part of insider and clap F. Pablo is in

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the inside. So you can ask some questions directly. But yeah,

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thanks for coming. Word of mouth. It's all the the chatter

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today. Right Pablo? Oh, yeah, that's what everyone's talking

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about. But it's not enough.

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Word about this is great. No, don't get me wrong. But is it

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really enough to sustain long term growth? You just, you know,

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rainbows and sunshine, you know, long term? I don't know. I

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mean, it can be. But it can also lead you into something

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bigger, better and more different.

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So I'm going to turn it over to Pablo. He's given us an hour,

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more than an hour because he made a custom presentation for

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you all, which did not have to do. But he made an awesome

1:09

presentation all about how to gain more trust, build a bigger

1:13

community, make more money. Thanks to word of mouth, but

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specifically movement building. So Pablo, the show is yours.

1:20

All the things, baby. Mark, thank you for having me, man. As

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you know, I had I was completely going to just give you a keynote

1:29

that I have prepared for next month. And last night, I decided

1:31

to completely rewrite this thing. Because when I get in a in a

1:34

room full of marketers of your level, I get massive imposter

1:38

syndrome. So I I'm going to give you a disclaimer. I'm not a I'm

1:41

not a slide creator. I'm not a presentation maker. But I think

1:45

I can deliver a good message here. So bear with me on the

1:48

design and all this good stuff. But like Mark said, Mark, when he

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first reached out to me, he said, I want you to create a

1:54

presentation on movement making and I immediately cowered, I

1:57

said, what about word of mouth? But no, I decided I decided to

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really challenge myself about how to take this word of mouth

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thing into a movement, because all the marketers that I want to

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hang out with are focused on creating movements. And we all

2:12

know that if we're going to do it, we need to create a community

2:16

of people on a mission to something, right? But before that

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starts to pay off, we need to create short term wins in order

2:24

to sustain it to sustain the investment in this movement in

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this thing that we are doing. And that's why I focus on word of

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mouth, because word of mouth can be something that you can

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accelerate in a in a like a quarter time span kind of thing.

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And you can measure its results. And if you can show these

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indicators that word of mouth is working, and you tailor it

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towards this like movement methodology, now you got a chance

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to sustain it for the long game. And the only reason why I'm

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qualified to talk to you about this is because let me see if

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this is working. Okay, so in 2020, we drove $32 million worth of

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revenue from 30 miles in one year. And what I mean by that is,

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we created this, this show that by the end of it, by the end of

3:14

year one, we generated 40 million bucks off of this new digital

3:18

channel. That was a community play. And when we looked back at

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it, we realized that those 40 million, 80% of them were

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attributed back to 30 people that were either upgrading

3:32

increasing their lifetime value themselves, referring us new

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people, getting on the phone with prospects that weren't sure

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we could trace 80% of that 40 million back to 30 to 30

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mouths. And ever since then, we've leaned into it and we've

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turned it into this vibrant community where we're hosting

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events. And we're doing all this good stuff. And now that I'm in,

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you know, four years later, I'm looking back and I'm seeing the

3:54

things that the things that turned it into a movement, the way

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that I'm seeing other movements happen in similar

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methodologies across the go to market world, which we're going

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to talk about today, all have something in common, which is

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something that I'm calling experiential content marketing.

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And what I mean by experiential content marketing is the design

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and delivery of events that are created specifically with the

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co creation of content, with not just the people that you're

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inviting to be stars of the event, not just the people that

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are invited to be on stage, but also with a deliberate set

4:31

path for the audience to get to that stage and be part of the

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co creation of the content and the plan for how you're going to

4:38

distribute that afterwards. So that's what I mean by

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experiential content marketing is not just events, its events

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made to co create content with your audience. First in mind,

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right, not a giant event, not just for a good time, or co

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creation of content and for that experience. And I'm going to

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explain to you what I mean by that. But first, let me tell you

4:58

how I got here. Um, about nine years ago, I my brother passed

5:04

away and at his funeral, 1200 people showed up. And as I

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looked around this Catholic church, I had been a part of

5:14

forever. And you know, quite frankly, since I was about 14,

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was like half one foot in one foot out, I looked around and I

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thought, man, this isn't just like my religion. This is my

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community. And these people really supported us for the last

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two years while he was battling cancer. And they're really

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supporting us now. And this is so valuable that I could never

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leave this community. And for whatever reason, people say that

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in your, you know, your, I think it's like with in times of

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great pain comes great clarity, my brain switched to, Oh my God,

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this just solved for turn. And there's a business case here

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for this whole like community model thing. And ever since then,

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I've been on this mission, I've been on this mission for like

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nine years to prove community creation as a viable tool for

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business development. Lucky for me, I had spent the last eight

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years in Miami, building these little communities, these young

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professional groups for charities. And I had one trick to

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form these things. I had created four of these. And there was

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one trick when we started forming them out recruit people by

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saying, Hey, Miami is a flaky city. If you want to meet people

6:22

that care at least a little bit about something else other than

6:25

themselves, join this group. And oh, by the way, when we host our

6:29

meetings, we host them in the boardroom of somebody that's on

6:32

the board of directors. So you get to meet the director and you

6:35

get to grow a relationship with him for about 20, 25 minutes

6:37

to tell you about his career. And then we plan our happy hour,

6:40

we plan a volunteer event, we plan our fundraiser. And I

6:42

realized that that trick, which then got me on the boards of

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all these different charities, I started using that trick to

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recruit young professionals into the groups, then I started

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getting really connected with other directors. And I started

6:53

using that trick to get friends of the directors,

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influential people in town that weren't on these boards to host

6:59

events for the charity itself. And then eventually I got so

7:03

connected that I started using the people that I had met in all

7:06

these events and all these different things to do business

7:08

development for my construction company that was a hospital

7:11

builder, university park builder, I'd approach the developer

7:14

and say, Oh, hey, I know what you're doing is trans story

7:16

into development. There's a politician on the board of one

7:18

of my charities that cares about public transportation. Let's

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host an event about how important this is for the board

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for the for the young professionals of Miami and boom, I'd

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be back dooring like $60 million contracts. And as I was

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doing this thing and graduated as into business development from

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just green building construction guy, I started listening to

7:35

Gary V. Experience this 2017. And I started thinking, Oh, man,

7:39

what this guy is doing by taking these keynotes and having

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people ask him questions and then repurposing it for Instagram

7:47

and for and for YouTube and all these different things is not

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similar to what I'm doing. It just has scale because there's

7:53

content and I just didn't shut up about this thing until that got

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the opportunity to leave Miami and test my thesis in a small

8:00

startup up here in Jacksonville for e-commerce sellers for

8:03

Amazon retail arbitrage people. And I got there. It was a

8:08

dumpster fire, right? Like the code wasn't really working. The

8:11

head developer quit. The CEO had just gotten a ripoff report. I

8:14

just partnered with this guy and just I just quit my job a

8:16

week before. And but I said, you know what, I'm gonna I'm gonna

8:20

go to work here. And what I did was in 2000 early 2018, I saw

8:26

that our 12 highest paying customers made up 30% of our

8:31

recurring revenue. And we were turning customers like crazy.

8:33

I was like, we can't lose these folks. I started doing an

8:35

every other week zoom call where we would show up, give them a

8:39

little bit of value, record the call and then let them

8:41

commiserate and give each other advice. And soon they all kind

8:45

of became best friends. Then we hosted an event down in Panama

8:48

where we took him down and we had to present their businesses to

8:50

us. We took what we learned from their business and turned it

8:52

into a class because each person did something really, really

8:54

well. So we turned it into this class package. It sold it for

8:57

5,000 bucks a pop. That led to our first like big cash win

9:00

fall and like stabilizing of things. Six months later, we

9:03

created an event where we put them as the main speakers to

9:05

come meet them. And in a year, we had completely solved for this

9:08

like brand crisis churn crisis that we had, because we were

9:11

using the content in our funnels to bring people to a

9:14

community that then graduates to an event where they meet these

9:17

people that are in our advertising. And at the end of

9:19

year one, I thought, man, I proved my thesis, but I don't

9:21

really want to build this business. I'm gonna go continue

9:24

this mission of community creation for business development.

9:26

Took me about a year to productize that thing. That's

9:29

when I met JWB, which we're going to talk about this case

9:31

study of the $40 million in one year in the community that we

9:33

built called the Not Your Average Investor Show. And now I was

9:37

just telling Mark, man, like, I don't know if you all know who

9:39

Mark Schafer is, but like, he wrote about me in his book and my

9:42

case study in his book. I've been written about in the ultimate

9:45

sales machine. And I just have like this like massive, like, I

9:48

don't know, I was a construction guy five years ago, but I've

9:51

just been chasing this thing. And I want to share this is this

9:55

is my latest thinking. This is what I've the latest thing I

9:58

literally like congealed all of this last night. And let's talk

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about this Not Your Average Investor Show experience, right?

10:06

So this is a $150 million company where what it's called is

10:10

turnkey rental property investing. They've been on the

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front page of the Wall Street Journal twice before I got there.

10:16

And what they have figured out is how to give somebody a cash

10:20

flowing rental property that they find that they either build or

10:24

remodel, sell it to the person. And then they are the property

10:27

managers. They give you a portfolio manager that manages the

10:30

whole experience and they and they grow a single family

10:34

workforce housing rental income portfolio for you in the most

10:38

passive way possible. Right. And Greg's thing was, man, we've

10:42

grown this company for 16 years. But we still can't we're not

10:47

having a good we're not having any any luck getting people from

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the internet to do business with us. Our number one channel is

10:54

this one like real estate educator that we're paying super,

10:57

super high commissions to. And I need to diversify from that.

11:00

I need to find a way to to market this thing online. And this

11:05

was end of 2019, right? So I was like, all right, let's do this

11:08

show kind of like what we did at econ. We're going to show up

11:11

once a week. We ended up started doing it twice a week where

11:15

we're going to talk to attractive figures, people that have

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and you know that are experts in real estate, people that are

11:20

experts in the local economy about why it's so good to invest in

11:23

Jacksonville, people on your team, yourself, teach people, educate

11:27

the moment that we find somebody that's super active in this,

11:29

we're going to bring the clients up on stage. We're going to

11:32

interview them. We're going to make stars out of them. It's

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going to lead to a community. We're going to repurpose all the

11:36

content blah, blah, blah, blah. And he was like, ah, that's

11:38

crazy, man. But at the end of the day, nobody had a better idea.

11:41

So he gave me a shot. And that's what happened. By the end of

11:45

year one, we were having a fan appreciation show where 12

11:49

clients came on back to back to back talking about, man, this is

11:52

so valuable to me. I feel like I'm a part of a community. This is

11:56

why I do business with JWB. That quarter was the biggest quarter

11:59

that they've ever had. When we did the study, we realized this

12:02

whole idea of like 30 people drove this thing. We went from

12:06

having 1200 online leads and 22 deals closed from online leads

12:11

to 680 online leads and 60 deals closed from online leads,

12:16

right? It created this like social validation that allowed

12:19

people to understand what this was without having to be

12:22

educated by somebody else that they paid $25,000 to as soon as

12:26

that started working, I was like, man, the world's starting to

12:28

open up. We need to get people together. These folks that you

12:31

see on the bottom left drew drew Jen and her husband Renee were

12:35

in Atlanta one time, they got together, they sent us a picture.

12:38

Then they came down to Jacksonville to hang out with us. We

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started doing these like little events. We started talking

12:44

out real estate seminars, Greg and I and then eventually

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hosted a small event like 25 people in Jacksonville. The next

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year was like 50 people in Jacksonville and sold three homes.

12:53

This last year year for we had a 125 person two day event that

12:59

sold out in a week and had a 50 person waiting list. And most

13:03

importantly, what's happened is 35% of their new client

13:08

acquisitions come from people that have shown up to one of our

13:14

experiential content marketing experiences, whether it's the

13:17

show or the event and bought a property within 30 days of

13:22

interacting with that. So that is a small, small target

13:26

window. 35% of their revenue is coming from people that within

13:30

30 days came to one of these events. Closing on a house takes

13:34

about 22 days. Right. So we made the target as small as

13:37

possible. This is not accounting for the footprint on

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YouTube. This is not accounting for the footprint on social

13:42

media. We're just attributing 35% influence super direct for this

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movement of people that call themselves natural average

13:50

investors that have turned into this community that's become

13:53

this like giant social validation exercise. And in these four

13:56

years, what I have realized is that there is a real pattern

14:02

recognition. There's no more just Hey, Gary V talking about

14:06

being the digital mayor and doing it. I in 2019, I went to

14:10

funnel hacking live. And I saw Russell Brunson from ClickFunnels

14:14

doing a very similar thing. He had this giant event and people

14:18

on stage where all people that had succeeded with this product

14:21

and he was giving them these like golden records, awards and

14:25

making heroes out of them. Right. Like it was he and having

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him on his podcast and having them on his content stream. Right.

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He was sharing the stage with them. Then Sangram Vajray with

14:37

flip my funnel. He's done the same exact thing. Right. Like

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started these like flip my funnel events, then built a

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community off of it has a super successful podcast that people

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from the community come out on the podcast and do all this type

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of stuff and have these events that they gather around. And then

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the latest one that I was like, Oh man, Jesus, like seriously,

14:55

is Chris Walker was doing this one to one. Right. Like Zoom

15:00

call where people were showing up week after week, becoming

15:03

friends with each other. People got semi famous got good jobs

15:07

based on being part of that community. There's people, there's

15:10

people in there. I know their names just because they

15:12

contributed so much and they know my names because they

15:14

contributed so much. Right. He built this community as well,

15:17

using the same exact thing. This playbook is out there. And to

15:20

be very honest, like I'm shocked that nobody that such few

15:24

people are doing this. You see a smattering of people doing

15:27

this. I know proof marketing is starting to do something like

15:29

this. I know that it's like gold something there. They're like

15:34

a virtual event platform. They do something like this. But you

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see very few companies doing this like digital live event

15:40

pairing it with in person events. If you look at what club

15:43

PF is, it's very similar to this playbook. Right. Like this is

15:48

doable. And you're just starting to see it everywhere. And to me,

15:53

what these things are doing really, really well, is that

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they're getting the right words into the right mouths around a

16:00

watering hole, right, which are these experiential content

16:03

marketing activations. So let's talk about that. Let's talk

16:06

about this idea of the words. I am obsessed with category design.

16:11

I know that there's a lot of misnomers out there about

16:13

category design. People are like, really do we need more words?

16:16

Do we need more people to call something this? Isn't it like

16:18

making fetch happen? The way that I explain category design is

16:23

the idea of centering everything around a problem, not your

16:29

product, not your brand, not your, no, not your big idea. But

16:34

the problem itself. And to me, this is the category design is

16:41

that created into like an industrial framework for

16:44

influence. And the reason why I think this idea of starting with

16:50

the problem first is because just in a natural setting, you

16:54

never really start a conversation with anybody. All you can do is

16:57

enter the conversation happening in their head. Right. So if you

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show up as somebody that is in the conversation in their head, then

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you have this chance to get them to go along with whatever you're

17:07

saying, you have this chance to influence them and entering

17:10

through a problem that they identify that you bring forth to

17:13

them that you take from being non obvious to obvious, or again,

17:18

taking a obvious problem and taking a non obvious solution and

17:21

making it obvious, that is the entry point for influence with

17:25

anybody I've ever, I've ever met from like a personal level to to

17:30

anything else, any kind of like leader of a movement, anything

17:33

like that, right? So let's talk about how you create that. This

17:36

is the category design formula, which I learned from my friends

17:39

at the category design at that advisors, Kevin Manie and Mike

17:42

Damp house. And it's this idea that if you start with the

17:45

context with a shift in context, and then you go into, Hey,

17:50

because these things changed, now there's this problem. Now

17:54

there's this thing missing. It requires an idea, an innovation,

17:59

something to solve it. Right. So I put the context here in all

18:04

caps, because that is where you really, really got a nail it. If

18:08

you can't walk into the conversation empathizing with

18:12

where your client, where the person that you're talking to,

18:14

where your boss is already thinking and you're describing

18:17

their life as it is to them, and it makes sense and you get them

18:20

agreeing, then you have a chance to be like, okay, because I know

18:24

where you're coming from, I know where the problem is for where

18:27

you're trying to get. And then you get a chance for the

18:30

innovation for the for the for the big idea, which you can name a

18:34

category of you like. And then the idea is to put it into a

18:38

point of view, right? The point of view is the narrative around

18:42

this problem around around this thing. This formula I took from

18:47

John Ruggie. And the POV is very simple as you start with how

18:51

the world is the problem with it, the symptoms of the problem,

18:56

the new way of doing things, and then the new world. And what

18:59

that looked like for JWB is we knew that people wanted to invest

19:04

in real estate. We had all these stats around the fact that if

19:09

you ask most Americans, the number one thing that they say is

19:12

wealth that will build wealth is real estate, but then you ask

19:15

what they're invested in, and real estate is in the top three,

19:18

right? So like, that's what the world looks like. The world

19:20

wants to invest in real estate. What's missing is an easy way to

19:25

invest in real estate without being an expert in it, and

19:28

without being a plumber and blah, blah, blah, blah. So the

19:31

innovation is how do you create a company that is vertically

19:34

integrated from like the acquisition of the asset all the

19:37

way through the life, the life of it and the returns and helping

19:41

you manage that, that solves that thing, right? So that was the

19:43

category formula. And as we've continued, it's evolved, right?

19:47

Now we have these statistics around Americans are not able to

19:50

retire, right? Like they're the average American is reaching

19:53

retirement age with less than $500,000 in savings. They're

19:57

unable to replace 50% of their income when they reach 65. That

20:03

means that they're not retiring. They're having to continue to

20:05

work and to make things worse, we're getting older. We're living

20:08

to 100, right? The problem with that is that the way that we've

20:11

been taught to invest is this idea of like investing in these

20:14

like high growth stocks and things like that. So that at a

20:18

certain age, you put it in this really conservative like bond

20:20

stuff that creates cash flow for you. So you go from growth to

20:24

cash flow. And then once you're there, you can't take risks with

20:27

it. And it's not really going to grow. It's just meant to like

20:29

spout off money off of the thing that you've already built. And

20:33

at the end of the day, that is how most of us are investing, but

20:38

real estate doesn't work that way. What if you could have a cash

20:41

growth portfolio that continues to grow and continues to give you

20:45

better options as you get older, even in retirement, you're

20:49

actually don't have to be as risk averse because this thing

20:51

is continuing to go and continuing to grow in cash flow,

20:53

which is what you need to retire. And that you can do through

20:56

real estate. And when if you do it through real estate, now, you

21:00

know, as you get older, you have more options, blah, blah, blah,

21:02

that's the new world. That's the use cases, right? So that's,

21:04

that's what's really evolved for us as a point of view. But

21:08

here's the important thing. Instead of focusing on this idea

21:12

of, am I nailing the name of my category? Notice I haven't set

21:15

a category there, right? Like we've, we've messed around with

21:18

cash growth portfolios, we've mess around with like vertically

21:20

integrated, investing, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah,

21:23

none of that has has really hit. But what really hits for people

21:28

is the other pieces of this thing, right? This like current

21:31

state of the world, this problem with it, this

21:33

ramification, the future states, all the stuff are things that

21:36

we're seeing them repeat word for word the way you say it,

21:39

vertical integration, cash growth portfolio, not an average

21:43

investor, right? Like all this type of stuff. And here's your

21:46

shout out, Joe. I was talking with Joe Zabak about this in

21:49

Nashville recently. And we came to this aha, that the category

21:54

name is like the name of the movie that you're going to watch.

21:56

But these words, these cast of words, these terms, these,

22:00

these sentences, the way that you describe things, these are

22:02

the one liners that you repeat from the movie, right? Like I was

22:05

just talking to Mark about, about Ace Ventura, and, and how I'm

22:09

always repeating lines from Ace Ventura, right? I rarely say

22:12

the movie Ace Ventura, but you bet your ass, I'm like, Oh,

22:15

righty then, you know, like it's, it's those things that stick

22:18

that you're, that you're able to get people to say. And if you're

22:22

getting people to see that, that's the word of mouth that

22:24

happens at scale. Those are the words that that will catch on

22:28

that will create this like flywheel of goodness that happens. I

22:32

was just talking to James Carberry from Sweetfish Media, who by

22:37

the way has been category king of B2B podcasting already. He

22:40

tried designing this category called content based networking.

22:44

And he never really felt like that really caught on content

22:47

based networking, even though his business caught on, right? Like

22:49

he is probably the only guy I know doing really well with B2B

22:52

podcasting. But as he's designing this new category around

22:57

own media and servicing own media, he's focused much less on, on

23:03

the, on the category name, as much as the problem, the villain,

23:08

which he's calling commodity content. And what he's realized

23:12

is that when he came up with commodity content, that thing

23:15

has caught on way more than any other thing that he had created

23:18

around content based networking, he's seeing it in people's

23:20

slides, people are posting about it on social media, because he

23:24

hit at the vein of the problem, right? So you're looking for all

23:27

these one liners. But the number one one liner that you really,

23:31

really want to hit is phrasing the problem the way that somebody

23:36

sees it better than they can say it themselves. Because he or

23:38

she who can state the problem the best will be known to have the

23:41

solution. Mark, I know that when we were talking about this

23:44

stuff, you, you wanted to talk about this idea of the villain

23:47

and the value of the villain. You got anything on this?

23:49

It's super important. And this is, this is so fundamental. So

23:54

I've been fortunate to be part of two category creating movement

23:58

making companies HubSpot and Drift. You could say maybe a

24:01

third with air meat, but HubSpot, everyone knows HubSpot for what

24:04

Pablo, what is HubSpot known for? In-by marketing. In-by

24:07

marketing. And so you think, right, the problem is

24:12

outbound marketing, right? Because they positioned it like,

24:14

well, you know, the old way is outbound marketing. The new way

24:18

the category is in by marketing. But no, Pablo, that's not,

24:21

that's not the problem at the end of the day. You know what the

24:25

problem really is though, or was it? It still is today, but like

24:28

back in 2008, 2009, what the problem was? You remember those

24:31

days?

24:31

Outbound sales wasn't work.

24:33

Upbound sales. What is outbound sales though? What does it do

24:36

you as a as a person? It burns you out. It burns you out. It

24:40

interrupts you. It interrupts you. The problem was people were sick

24:44

and tired of being interrupted. Yeah. Interruption marketing.

24:48

And they put a label to it because it was, it was, you know, I

24:51

think in their case, outbound, inbound, it rhymes. It's the, you

24:55

know, black, white, whatever. But like the actual fundamental

24:58

problem when they thought about the product design, how they

25:01

built the product and the solutions, which is blogging,

25:05

content, etc. It's like, how do we help people not be

25:09

interrupted as much? And how do they get educated and use

25:13

content as a mechanism to create some type of relationship,

25:18

trust. And we use the magnet of pulling them in, inbound into

25:23

our funnel versus pushing outbound, interruptive based

25:27

marketing on them. Yeah. Yeah.

25:30

Yeah. That's one of you. Go ahead. That hits, right? Like

25:33

nobody likes to be interrupted. Nobody likes to be spammed.

25:35

So people are like, okay, there's got to be a better way,

25:38

right? Exactly. So they phrased it as the current state of the

25:41

world is, here's all these things creating interruption.

25:44

They're interrupting your life. So that's the problem. The

25:48

ramifications is it's not working as well anymore because

25:51

everyone's doing this crap. We're all bad robo calls were at

25:54

that point. You know, all this junk mail, spam, you have a

25:58

spam spam everywhere, right? What's the new way inbound? So

26:02

how that was about example, drifts example, conversational

26:06

marketing. People people think the problem is forms. No, the

26:11

problem, you know, it was formed to some degree. What is the

26:14

real problem though, when it comes to a form or comes to

26:17

anything with really a website? friction.

26:20

So the current state of the world is you try to get a hold of

26:26

someone who get a question answered via website. It is

26:29

painful. It still is today. Pretty painful, quite honestly.

26:32

It's getting better. But the forms were the poster villain,

26:37

villain 100%, 100%. The real problem though, when you thought

26:41

about from like a buyer standpoint and a marketer standpoint

26:47

is friction is creating a massive drag on the efficiency of

26:54

your go to market. Form is the thing creating the friction

26:57

though. So it's like, it's usually like a couple things you

27:01

have to kind of unpack and then to your point, which one lands

27:04

better in drifts case, form is landed better. In HubSpot's case,

27:08

outbound land and better than interruption. Yeah, I just,

27:11

you know, it's all about positive. And I've talked to you

27:13

about this before. You didn't have this all on day one, right?

27:17

Like these were iterations that you hit based on interactions

27:19

with the market. 100%, like what so commodity content, I love

27:23

that. The one that we're going all in on right now, and you're

27:26

going to hear me say this a lot more excited. I've been validating

27:28

it is generic GTM. Cool. So anyway, we'll pause there. If you

27:36

guys have questions or thoughts about this, Pablo and I would

27:39

love to riff and rap with you on this because to me, this is

27:42

how you move from word of mouth to movement making and how you

27:46

operationalize word of mouth. I'll turn it back to you, Pablo.

27:48

All right, cool. I'm going to land this plant with this. So, so

27:50

again, we're looking for this cast of words. And you are

27:54

iterating through this cast of words to see which one of these

27:57

the important thing is to have it in mind when you're hearing

27:59

people repeat it, which one of these different parts of the cast

28:04

it is, right? And then so we talked about the words. Now we're

28:08

going to talk about the mouths. And this is probably my ugliest

28:11

slide yet, but you know what it gets attention. So, at the bottom

28:15

line is the mouse got to go from an attractive figure to a super

28:19

consumer. And I'm going to break down what each of these is,

28:21

right? This is Pennanteller. Has everybody heard of Pennanteller?

28:26

Right? One of the most successful magic acts ever had HBO

28:31

specials, have shows, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Did you know

28:35

that the secret to Pennanteller success, their word of mouth

28:39

comes from the fact that after every show, they're in the lobby

28:42

greeting everybody. It's not a VIP experience. They just do it

28:46

with everybody. They let everybody just come up close to

28:48

him, shake their hand, come see who they are, and then they

28:51

go tell their friends. Right? So, this is an old trick of just

28:54

like giving people access to the attractive figure really,

28:58

really works for word of mouth. And these experiential content

29:01

marketing scenarios are, you know, the attractive figure has to

29:05

be either somebody that is really knowledgeable, really

29:09

accomplished in the way that in the thing that people are trying

29:12

to understand, people are trying to achieve. It could be the CEO of

29:15

the company. It could be a chief evangelist. And they also have

29:19

to be really welcoming. Right? So, like, sometimes it works

29:22

really, really well with a pair. When you look at demand-gen live,

29:25

it was Chris Walker and Megan Bowen. People really sleep on the role

29:28

of Megan Bowen in that execution. But she was the one that was

29:32

like super welcoming, set the table. And Chris Walker was just

29:35

like the attractive figure that everybody wanted to talk to,

29:37

because he was so smart on the way he said things. We set up the

29:40

same exact thing with, with Greg Cohen, and this idea of the

29:44

attractive figure. I'm not sure if this audio is going to play,

29:46

but like, this is a couple of our super consumers talking about

29:49

access to the attractive figure.

29:52

Kind of heritage.

29:58

Yeah, it's a little core.

30:22

Yeah, all right. So, I put the subtitles on there.

30:24

Anyways, that's them saying, listen, access to the CEO, this is what we

30:28

come here for. What kind of company is this open and honest?

30:31

And getting to know you guys makes us feel like we are,

30:34

you know, like that we're family and we really, really trust you.

30:36

Right? So, it's like this idea of getting in front of getting

30:40

the people that are really interested in the problem to get

30:44

in close contact with the person who's most solving the problem

30:48

is really, really important. So, you've got to figure out who your

30:51

attractive character is. Be it the CEO, be it a chief evangelist,

30:55

and whether it's going to be a one person or a duo that is,

30:59

you know, like the one, two punch of like very welcoming,

31:02

set the table and expertise or vice versa. Right? So,

31:06

you see this in all of this. You see it in the Chris Walker thing,

31:09

you see it in the Gary V. thing, you see it in the Russell Brun

31:11

something, you see it in the Sangram thing. I don't know how that counts here

31:15

in Club PF. Who's the really welcoming expert and who's the other guy,

31:18

Mark and Nick? I'm just kidding. So, the next thing is,

31:22

the people that you want to interact the most with,

31:26

that you want to not just give access to the attractive character,

31:32

but also show a clear path to the stage itself to be on,

31:37

you know, like to be highlighted is the super consumer.

31:40

Super consumers is a concept by Eddie Eun who's one of the category

31:44

pirates where he's essentially got all this data that shows that

31:48

when you look across many businesses, 80% of revenue

31:55

often comes from 10% of the clientele, right? Like they're the most profitable

31:59

ones. They're the ones that they really, really want to sell to.

32:01

And in digital business, it's even more exaggerated. It's like 0.1,

32:05

it's like 1% of the clientele provides 80% of the profitability,

32:09

not revenue, the profitability. And that's what he coins a super consumer.

32:13

So, that was part of the whole methodology in this

32:17

execution as well. It's the same methodology in ClickFunnels,

32:21

say, you know, very similar to what Peak Community is doing and

32:25

what Sangram has done and what the GTM partners are,

32:27

you know, the execution that they're doing and even in DGL, right? Like,

32:31

I know the names of many people that became regulars on DGL because

32:34

they would become a recurring cast of characters

32:37

that would support the community and they would also become like semi-famous

32:41

within the circle. I'm not going to play this thing, but this is a clip of

32:45

essentially them saying, "Man, it was crazy being at the event.

32:48

People wanted to take pictures with us and people wanted to meet us."

32:51

And, you know, people who when they're in Baltimore, Atlanta, they come drive

32:55

to

32:55

meet us. And I tell them very clearly, that's because we deliberately

33:00

knew that we had to turn you guys into stars in order for this community to

33:03

work, right? So, this elevation, this like

33:06

intenful action through the through the experiential content marketing

33:10

of showing the super consumer and showing to other super consumers that if

33:14

you care enough about this problem, we're going to promote you too.

33:17

It's a big part of this thing along with the words themselves because they're

33:21

your evangelists, right? Like a community, a movement goes from like

33:25

one chief evangelist to like eight to 12 apostles and then from there,

33:30

the message spreads, right? It's not unlike the original religious metaphor.

33:34

This is how communities work too. You need to go from being Superman

33:37

to forming the Avengers because it's the Avengers where you start to reach

33:41

scale.

33:41

And then once you have that going on, then it's about these watering holes,

33:46

right? Like how can you get somewhere where they attract the figure,

33:50

the super consumers and prospects, people in the periphery, all interact

33:55

together

33:56

through this experiential content marketing activation stuff, right? So,

34:00

just to frame it, experiential content marketing in a digital form is exactly

34:05

this.

34:06

The live show where you are bringing on experts, you're giving out your

34:09

opinions,

34:10

you're allowing people to interact. I'll never forget like a year and a half

34:13

in the first time that I did a show without Greg, him and his partners were

34:17

watching it on Zoom

34:18

and they're like, "Holy shit, what is happening in the chat?" When we're live

34:22

and the Zoom call,

34:23

it's like us giving this content, but the chat is going off. It's just like, "

34:27

Oh, hey, how you been?

34:28

People making friends with each other, just going left and like talking to each

34:33

other,

34:33

they know each other, they have nicknames for each other, all these different

34:36

things. It was

34:36

the same thing at DGL." So, this is an experience, right? And this ability to

34:42

think of it as an

34:43

experiential content experience where you're thinking, "How can I get people

34:47

involved? How can I promote

34:48

them to the top? How can I use this content in my marketing afterwards?" That

34:52

is the first thing

34:53

that you want to be thinking about strategically when you're creating these

34:57

events, these digital

34:58

events, not just who's the famous speaker that can talk to you and how many

35:02

people can I get there,

35:03

right? That's the switch in the mentality. Then after that, you can, oh, by the

35:07

way,

35:07

you're seeing this like super fancy execution, right? Because we're like in a

35:11

studio and blah,

35:12

blah, blah, blah. Anybody can do this. With Descript and one virtual assistant,

35:17

you can do this.

35:18

We have a team of four virtual assistants, which leads to about $5,000 a month

35:22

in payroll for me

35:24

that can execute this for up to five companies, right? It's not a lot of

35:28

payroll for one company

35:29

to do it internally. If you have the person dedicated to it, the expert and the

35:34

virtual

35:34

assistant that can use Descript and can do all these different tasks, it's do

35:38

able for under $1,000

35:39

bucks a month. I know this because my buddy Mike, Mike Grisele, big Mike, he's

35:44

an engineer. He's a

35:46

seven person engineer firm. His whole team is in India. He does this, right?

35:50

Like he does these

35:51

live shows, goes to trade shows and does this thing. We helped him set this

35:57

thing up and execute

35:59

and him and his guy, Matun from India, do this on a weekly basis at trade shows

36:06

and do this like

36:06

digital experiential content marketing stuff and it's working for him, right?

36:10

Like one year in,

36:11

it's already showing big, big, big results for him and his civil engineering

36:16

company that sells

36:17

to Colorado and Texas and the West Coast, right? So this is B2B as well. Then

36:22

there is the in-person

36:24

stuff, right? Like this is another one of our clients, Rockway exhibits and

36:27

events. We went to the

36:30

trade show about the trade show in the street and we in his booth, we set up a

36:35

podcast to do

36:36

this thing live and we did it the same exact way. How do we just create these

36:39

experiences where we're

36:40

co-creating content with experts, with people we want to highlight, with folks

36:44

that we want to

36:44

bring closer to the center of the sun and this thing went so well at that thing

36:48

last year that

36:49

they invited us this year to talk about it and teach it as a class. So it went

36:54

incredibly well,

36:55

but you don't even need to do it at a trade show. You can just do it in a bar

37:01

with an extra room

37:02

adjacent to the trade show, which is what we did this year because we didn't

37:05

exhibit. We just did

37:06

it there and it's what I was doing when I was doing these charity events. Like

37:10

there's so many

37:10

places that have extra space on a Sunday night that you just get 20 people

37:14

there, an attractive

37:16

figure, someone to speak to and you just produce this like panel that you would

37:21

see like at a big

37:22

event, but you just do it at a small scale and the reason why it still works is

37:26

because you're

37:26

making the content around it, right? Like if it's experiential content

37:30

marketing, not just an event,

37:31

it can scale and all you need is 10, 20 people in a small room and it feels

37:36

great. This was done

37:37

with a camera and with an iPhone camera and a couple of like Lavalier mics from

37:41

this company

37:42

called Movo, all you need is to create an event schedule to know who your

37:45

speaker schedule is

37:46

and have your production and distribution team that again could be VAs. But for

37:49

this type of

37:50

stuff, I suggest getting a camera guy. So and then, you know, as you do it, you

37:56

start with like the

37:57

five person, 10 person, 20 person and it goes, right? Like this is the series

38:02

of events for us at the

38:04

Not Your Average Investor show community movement. It was Drew, Jen and Renee

38:09

that met for dinner

38:10

one time, then they came down to Jacksonville. I met them for dinner, then Jen

38:14

hosted a small

38:15

gathering in her house in Monterey, California. That dude with a face mask wasn

38:18

't a client, but he

38:19

showed up because he was a fan of the show 30 days later, he was investing.

38:22

Then we hosted the

38:23

following year in Jacksonville, we had 50 people show up and then now following

38:27

year year four,

38:27

we have 125 people show up, 50 person waiting list and it's a thing, right?

38:34

Like now next year,

38:35

we're thinking about a 500 person event because this thing sold out so quickly,

38:38

we didn't even

38:38

get a chance to market it, right? But it's just a matter of getting those exper

38:42

iential content

38:43

marketing experiences going where you can combine now the podcast, right? The

38:48

digital

38:49

experiential content marketing with the in-person experiential content

38:52

marketing, but you just got

38:53

to treat it as attractive figure interacting to identify super consumers,

38:59

trying to figure out

39:00

what that cast of characters in the category design formula and point of view

39:05

is repeating it,

39:06

repeating it, repeating it until you start seeing it happen, identify the super

39:10

consumer,

39:10

bring him on stage, promote that as part of your marketing and your content and

39:14

the things that

39:14

you're doing, rinse and repeat, do it at your live events, create live events

39:18

whenever you're

39:18

going places. I'm doing this stuff whenever I travel, I'll look to do this by

39:23

myself, right?

39:24

Like it's not that hard to have your own podcast where you're doing this on a

39:28

weekly basis and

39:29

then when you go somewhere, like you go to Chicago, I look up my network on

39:32

LinkedIn and I said,

39:33

"Hey, I'm going to do like a tea tasting event at the Drake and whoever wants

39:37

to come can come,

39:38

10 people show up, we do a thing with my buddy Raj." Like these are things that

39:42

I've done. It doesn't

39:43

take a lot to do it with one person. You can absolutely do it within your

39:47

company and however

39:48

you're executing it. You just need to think about it this way, outsource to

39:53

virtual assistants,

39:55

run the program and just like have in mind this formula of the words, the

40:00

mouths and the watering

40:02

holes. The last thing that I'm going to say is just why word of mouth, right?

40:08

Let's get beyond

40:09

the movement thing. Let's just talk about this idea of word of mouth thing. In

40:13

the 60s, we were

40:14

seeing 76 ads per day. 2007, we're seeing 96 ads per day. Now the estimates are

40:19

we're seeing

40:19

four to 10,000 ads per day. Like this interruption marketing, what Mark was

40:23

just talking about,

40:24

it's insane. How are we going to break through this noise? How are we going to

40:30

outcompete people

40:32

with the bigger budgets? How can we challenge brands and it's by creating this

40:36

word of mouth.

40:37

Like there's crazy statistics about how over 80% of businesses believe that 60%

40:43

of their business

40:44

comes from word of mouth, but only 20% of them actually have a program for it.

40:48

So this to me is

40:50

the giant ball that people haven't figured out how to actually attack. That to

40:59

me means it's the big

41:00

opportunity. So whether it is you think about my framework with these like

41:04

exponential content

41:05

marketing and doing it this way, you got to think of something because this is

41:09

the big opportunity.

41:10

Because at the end of the day, business is a very simple equation. Cost of

41:13

client acquisition,

41:14

plus your cost of operations has to be less than or equal to your lifetime

41:18

value.

41:18

And this is what word of mouth looks like when you look across that, right?

41:22

This is

41:23

a financial advisor that works with doctors. We did a very similar execution

41:29

zoom show

41:30

with a podcast and try to show up a live events and stuff like that. This is

41:35

our most meager

41:36

results. Like this is this is our these are these are our lowest numbers that

41:42

we did.

41:42

Year one to year two, he went from 345 leads with 30 referred 66 new contracts

41:52

to 316 leads, 45 referred 76 new contracts, right? So less leads more revenue.

42:00

And the reason why

42:01

less leads more revenue is important is because of that equation, right? Like

42:05

this is what you need

42:06

to be seeing. And the experiential content, the experiential content marketing

42:11

event is the thing

42:12

that you measure it to. Did the person come to this and how much revenue came

42:16

from it? You should

42:17

start seeing less leads lead to more revenue. And this is what we saw at the

42:21

end of year one with

42:22

JWB. It was insane. It was Q one was like 1100 like 20 leads that came from the

42:30

website and they

42:31

closed around like 27 new deals. These are properties. These are 150,000

42:37

properties that they're selling.

42:38

By the end of Q four, they were getting around 600 something leads coming in

42:45

from the website.

42:46

And close to 70 deals being closed from that funnel, right? That is less leads

42:53

more revenue.

42:53

And what that does that word of mouth actually drives down cost of client

42:58

acquisition,

42:59

increases LTV and keeps operations constant. There is no other channel that

43:04

will do this.

43:05

This is the big opportunity. Find a way to stoke that find a way to measure it

43:11

and go for it.

43:11

It'll change your career. That's it.

43:13

>> Pablo, give me one or applause people. This is just coming right at you.

43:25

Fresh paint. Right? I mean, fresh paint.

43:30

>> Yeah.

43:31

>> No, so questions, you know, he's got some time to answer any questions you

43:35

have in the chat.

43:36

I have an observation. You didn't use, I don't think we can look at the

43:42

transcript to make sure

43:43

I don't think you used the word education or educate once.

43:48

You're a butt. I would argue, so that's an observation. Here's the question.

43:54

I would argue that's over half the battle of everything you just talked about.

44:00

Agree or disagree?

44:06

>> Yes. I think the content that comes out of it, like the experience for the

44:13

exponential

44:13

content marketing and the content that comes out of it has to either educate,

44:17

inspire or entertain.

44:19

And to me, education is kind of like the thing that is most tangible that

44:23

people show up for.

44:24

>> Okay. I'm just curious because I feel like education and education,

44:30

maybe education more so than educate is not a, people don't like that word,

44:35

especially

44:35

B2B. I don't want to be educated. But at the end of the day, that's what great

44:42

content is.

44:43

Like when you talk about commoditized content, commoditized content is generic

44:48

crappy content

44:49

because it doesn't do one of those three things you just mentioned. But it

44:52

definitely probably

44:54

doesn't educate. And for someone to really say, "Whoa, I'm now going to take

45:01

something that I

45:03

have learned about and now understand enough to then act and master it." That's

45:08

education, right?

45:09

A mastery model that I've used in the past is learn, understand, master. You've

45:14

got to first

45:15

teach to learn, but to really understand it, you've got to do it. And to master

45:20

it, you've got to

45:21

become the teacher. And I think that's basically what you're saying as part of

45:25

this process.

45:25

Because you have these people that come onto stage that have mastered it to

45:28

some degree,

45:29

and are still the student, but now they're becoming the teacher and teaching

45:33

others.

45:34

So this is an observation. >> Listen, I 100% agree with what you're saying.

45:38

The only reason why I reserve space for the other ones is because I've also

45:42

seen it work

45:44

the other way, right? Like, liquid death is not educating anybody on on on, you

45:50

know, environmental

45:50

resources or whatever. But they're entertaining as shit, and people pay

45:53

attention to their content

45:55

and they're and they're doing that stuff, right? So like, when I went to the 10

45:58

x conference for

45:58

Grand Car Donde, uh, I call that like, uh, Metallica arena concert had a baby

46:04

with a Mexican flea market.

46:05

It was just like fireworks and talking blah, blah, blah, and sell you, sell you

46:09

, sell you, sell you,

46:09

sell you, right? Like that, if you do that enough, if you create enough of a

46:14

spectacle and people have

46:15

the attention, people will continue to come and and and and be there, right? So

46:20

like, entertainment

46:21

plays, um, inspiration also plays, but I think the most accessible thing to us

46:25

in the B2B world

46:27

in the business world is education, right? Because everybody out here that's

46:30

doing business is trying

46:31

to reach some kind of objective in their life. And if you can show them a

46:34

better way, if you can

46:35

teach them how to do something that'll make their day better, that'll make them

46:38

more profitable,

46:39

or whatnot, that's absolutely an avenue to do it. And I think it's the one that

46:43

's most accessible to

46:44

most people because not most people aren't comedians, most people aren't

46:47

inspirational speakers,

46:48

most people aren't that, but people are, you know, care about their craft and

46:51

want to share it with

46:52

others. Well, it's like the Holy Trinity. You just created, right? You got the

46:56

education,

46:56

the entertainment and the inspiration, you know, it's, it's the Holy Trinity,

47:00

right?

47:01

Well, I mean, I'm going for it, bro. I want to be the five. So I put it out

47:03

here.

47:06

Folks, if you have any questions for Pablo, like, let, let him know. We can

47:09

take you up and you even

47:10

if you, if you're, you know, you're still going to raise your hands. But I mean

47:12

, I learned a ton.

47:14

I mean, so many great examples, so many great ways to think about the framing

47:20

of how to get to

47:22

the thing that's going to resonate because that's ultimately the unlocking

47:27

piece, I think. Would you

47:29

agree? Yeah, yeah, totally. I will listen, man. I think the, the unlocking

47:34

piece is short-term

47:35

victories on the way to a long-term goal, right? Like, so to me, this idea of

47:41

like,

47:42

these content experiences, right? It's, it's so daunting to think I need to

47:46

throw an event and I

47:47

need to get a hundred people there. It's much less, much less daunting to think

47:51

I need to throw

47:52

an event and get 10 people there and create some really, really good content

47:55

that's going to be

47:56

useful for me, right? Like, if you can go, people have much more capacity to

47:59

spearfish than they do

48:00

to like cast wide nets and get some fish on the boat, right? So like, to me, it

48:05

's that like, how can

48:06

you, how can you intersect the person that you want to be guilty by association

48:11

with,

48:11

the person that most admires you in your business and the person that most you

48:15

want to believe that

48:15

they should admire you in their, in your business, in the smallest room

48:19

possible? Like, if you can

48:21

get that stuff to work, whether it's digital or in person, then, then you're

48:26

start, you can start

48:27

compounding off of that, right? And then like, and then, and then use that for,

48:31

for content beyond that.

48:32

So, so smart. I think we're good with questions. I mean, you know, people know

48:38

where to find you,

48:38

we're just make sure though, where do they find you? Just look them now. Oh, if

48:42

you look at Pablo

48:42

Gonzalez on the internet, you're just going to find me. I'm the only one.

48:45

LinkedIn, I'm connected to Mark. Be the stage that live is my company, you know

48:53

, like, I feel like

48:55

most of the people that are here, I feel like I know I'm like one degree of

48:57

separation here,

48:58

and I'm super pumped that you're here. I love it. I love it. Well, thank you

49:01

again, Pablo. We will,

49:02

we will do what you said, which is make sure that this goes wide and far.

49:08

Yeah. I mean, listen, you guys, you guys are doing it, right? Like, you invited

49:11

me onto this stage

49:13

to then like, have me be able to like, promote people to be here that are going

49:16

to want to be in

49:16

club PF and are already in club PF and we're creating valuable content that

49:21

adds to people's lives.

49:22

And they want to be close to you because you're an attractive character. And

49:25

now they also see me

49:26

as a super consumer and want to get close to me. Like, it is, it is the

49:29

playbook. Like, you guys

49:30

are doing it. Everybody that's building a community online right now has some

49:33

form of this, right?

49:34

Like it's, it's about like tying in this plus live events and like doing it

49:39

purposefully over time

49:41

and like using that content strategically to influence people. I love it. I

49:46

love it. And

49:46

Chet and yes, start doing it. Act, act, act, right? Like don't overthink it. I

49:51

mean, just,

49:51

just act, right, Pablo? There's nothing, there's nothing better than just

49:54

jumping in.

49:55

Yeah, man. Chitam Bat saying more than questions, I'm just going to start doing

49:58

it. Was planning

49:59

a hole to meet for user research, but we'll turn that into a live podcast. Let

50:03

's go, bro. Do it.

50:04

That's it. Just start doing it. You're going to, you're going to see signals of

50:08

it, right? Like,

50:08

it's going to, whether, whether or not it leads to something or leads to an

50:11

insight or whatnot,

50:12

like you're going to start seeing signals from doing this activity and then

50:16

just like be very

50:17

purposeful about like landing on those words, figuring out who's like super

50:21

into it and then

50:22

king making them. Giddy up folks. Giddy up. Thank you, Pablo. See you, buddy.

50:27

Peace. Bye.

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