Join ClubPF
Mark Kilens 51 min

How to Enable Your Sales Team to Activate Your ABM Strategy


Learn from Jenna Chambers of Terminus on how to enable your sales team to activate your ABM strategy. Discover the role of sales, understanding data, and achieving sales & marketing alignment.



0:00

Hey folks, welcome to today's webinar, powered by TAC and Club PF with Terminus

0:08

My name is Mark Hillens.

0:11

My very special guest today is Jenna Chambers.

0:14

Jenna, what's going on?

0:15

Yeah, I'm good.

0:17

I'm excited.

0:18

How are you?

0:19

I'm good.

0:20

I'm good.

0:21

How long have you been with Terminus?

0:22

Just over two years.

0:24

So in some ways it feels like five minutes, in some ways it feels like five

0:26

years.

0:27

Is in that kind of weird, working from home stage where time doesn't move in a

0:31

normal way

0:31

anymore.

0:32

Exactly.

0:33

Yeah, no, I hear that.

0:34

I hear that.

0:35

If you folks have any questions, one of the letters know where you're listening

0:38

in from,

0:40

throw it up in the chat.

0:41

You should have access to the chat.

0:42

If you don't, I can enable it in case for some reason the chat isn't enabled.

0:47

Let us know in the Q&A.

0:48

So you can use the Q&A in the chat.

0:50

If you're listening to this on demand, thank you so much.

0:53

Jenna, you've been with Terminus for two years.

0:57

But you have a lot of experience in B2B Tech.

1:00

You've done many different things over the years.

1:04

We're going to unpack one of your favorite topics today, which is how to make

1:09

sure your

1:10

sales team is truly a partner with you when it comes to your account-based

1:15

marketing.

1:16

It is a topic that is very, very close to my heart.

1:20

As a career marketer who's recently gone to the dark side of sales, this has

1:24

been a hot

1:24

topic for me from the marketing side and now I see it from the sales side.

1:28

It's actually a different perspective.

1:30

So it's nice to be able to bring the two together.

1:32

I love it.

1:33

I love it.

1:34

And the key to all of this, when you think about your ABM is the who.

1:40

Like who are you trying to ultimately become a customer with the help of your

1:45

sales team,

1:46

right?

1:47

So we're going to dive into this right now.

1:49

Jenna, do you want to do any more of an introduction before we dive into today

1:54

's talk

1:54

and points down?

1:55

Do you want to tee anything else up for people?

1:57

No, I think it's just, you know, so I came up through, I would say, generalist

2:03

marketing,

2:04

kind of all aspects from branding to PBC to demand gen, etc, etc.

2:10

And I was in-house in a company when we were doing more traditional sort of

2:14

lead-in-demand

2:15

generation and we decided to make the move to, I'm going to age myself here,

2:19

but we called

2:20

it strategic key account pursuits as opposed to ABM because it was slightly

2:23

before that

2:24

was a thing.

2:25

And we had to figure it all out on our own.

2:27

We didn't realize that there were a bunch of resources out there.

2:31

We didn't realize that they were trying to test methods.

2:33

And so we went through that move on our own.

2:36

And that probably took us about a year, 18 months to do.

2:40

And it was a lot of lessons learned, which hopefully are helpful for you guys.

2:43

Painful for us at the time.

2:44

A bit helpful to be able to kind of path on.

2:47

And then since then I ended up agency side.

2:49

So I was doing like go-to-market strategies for clients, a lot of those were AB

2:54

M.

2:55

And those are some of the examples that I'll touch on today.

2:57

And then I've now ended up vendor side in a partner role, which is most

3:01

recently ended

3:02

up moving into heading up the sales team as well because we were just getting

3:06

so focused

3:07

on how best to run a partner deal that it became clear it wasn't that much

3:10

difference

3:11

for a direct deal.

3:12

And so now the whole new business team, the revenue team sits under me.

3:17

Fantastic.

3:18

Let's actually get into those conversation points today then.

3:21

Let's go right into it.

3:23

And those three conversation points are going to be about getting sales to

3:27

truly bind to

3:27

your ABM, how sales and marketing can actually work together and what sales

3:33

needs to know

3:34

to excel at this account based marketing motion.

3:39

And again, I would love to know people's take on what ABM is.

3:42

There's so much debate about this, Jenna, out on the internet, right?

3:46

Oh, yeah.

3:47

I've not heard any of that.

3:48

I don't know what you're talking about here.

3:50

Yeah, there's so much debate.

3:53

But yeah, let's unpack each of these.

3:56

So I'll let you run through the first one.

3:58

And folks, again, we're going to make this a conversation, ask questions, give

4:03

us your

4:03

opinions.

4:06

My high level opinion on ABM, Jenna, it's part of your go-to-market strategy.

4:12

It isn't like a go-to-market strategy on its own.

4:14

It's a way to really understand how to go after that ICP and make sure that you

4:21

're doing

4:21

it in a unified way.

4:25

But at the end of the day, ABM wasn't anything that's remarkably new because

4:29

sales has been

4:30

doing ABM for a long, long, long time.

4:33

It's like marketing is now caught up thanks to terminus creating the category.

4:39

That's my general thing.

4:40

Well, it's really interesting.

4:42

So just before we dive into that first point, I was having a conversation this

4:45

week at the

4:46

Gartner conference with a massive blue chip organization.

4:50

It was their global marketing team.

4:53

And they were asking me, is it normal for salespeople to lead evaluation of a

4:59

tool like

4:59

terminus?

5:00

And I was like, no, it's not normal.

5:03

They're in the conversation, but normally marketing leads the conversation and

5:06

they bring

5:07

sales in.

5:08

And they were saying that they feel like they're behind the ball because in

5:11

their company is

5:12

sales that's pushing for ABM and it's marketing that's kind of going, oh, I'm

5:15

not entirely

5:16

sure what this is.

5:17

And they're kind of in the research phase, which is one of the first times I've

5:19

ever

5:20

heard that that's a thing.

5:21

So maybe this transition is already starting to happen out in markets.

5:24

This is maybe a very timely conversation that we're having just now.

5:28

One can hope.

5:29

So let's dive into the first topic, pull up the slide again so you guys can

5:32

take a look

5:33

and follow along.

5:35

Let's go right into it, Jenna.

5:36

What do you think?

5:37

Perfect.

5:38

All right.

5:39

So trying to weave a bit of an analogy through this, which is that, you know,

5:44

before, so

5:45

today's session is all about how do you enable sales for ABM?

5:48

And there's two things that you need to do before you can even start to enable

5:52

sales.

5:52

This is the first one.

5:53

The first one is all about making sure that you've got sales buy-in.

5:57

You know, thinking about the analogy of skiing, it's, you know, you're not

6:01

going to go book

6:02

a ski holiday or you're not going to even think about going skiing or getting

6:05

on that

6:05

plane until you've gone to buy your ski gear.

6:07

Like it is step one of what you need to do.

6:09

And this is exactly the same for sales and marketing alignment.

6:13

So if you can pop onto the next slide, Mark, it's just a fact.

6:19

I think we're all aware of it that people hate change.

6:22

Like they just hate change, even if it's going to be good for them in the long

6:26

term.

6:26

There's something very, very confident about the status quo that kind of phrase

6:30

of better

6:31

the devil, you know.

6:32

But I think we all know that if you're going to launch ABM, it is almost

6:37

impossible that

6:38

you're going to get sales, all the sales team on board almost overnight.

6:42

That's just not going to happen.

6:43

You can put the best plans in place.

6:45

You can have the best strategy in the world, but that is not necessarily going

6:48

to happen

6:48

because there is an internal like culture shift that needs to happen.

6:53

So you've got some choices about what you can do here.

6:56

You can be bullish and just mandate that they get with the program or get out.

7:00

I mean, that is always going to feel like something that is being done to them

7:05

rather

7:05

than done for them.

7:06

And you're going to have some sort of coup on your hands.

7:09

It might be a silent coup.

7:10

People might not kind of chat back about it.

7:13

You might not hear too much about it, but they will just polish off their

7:16

resume or their

7:17

CV and they will just go job searching it and you will just have an exit.

7:20

And it's just not the way to do it.

7:22

So in terms of how you can go about this in a way that's maybe a bit more

7:27

helpful for

7:28

the sales team, there are three methods that I've seen work.

7:33

And then I'll talk about the one that's my personal favourite, which is dead

7:36

give way

7:36

as the blue harp beside it.

7:38

So let me talk about the other two first.

7:40

The first one is you can do this by you can change the comp plans.

7:45

So it's, you know, if you make ABM a profitable way for the sales team to do

7:50

business, you

7:51

know, there's a lot of culture change that can come from comp plans.

7:54

That's kind of the whole point of them is that they almost are used to drive

7:58

behaviours.

7:59

So maybe ABM accounts come with higher commission tiers.

8:03

When they close, you know, maybe there are kickers, target accounts get to

8:07

certain stages

8:09

of the funnel.

8:10

There are different ways that you can start to incentivise sales to move that

8:13

way that

8:13

doesn't just wait until the revenue hits the bank because if you only incentiv

8:18

ise through

8:19

comp plans through a revenue target, then, you know, sales people will go to

8:24

the path

8:24

of least resistance to get to the most money.

8:27

And that's good.

8:28

That's what we want them to do.

8:29

That's why they add revenue to our bottom line.

8:32

But if it's just as profitable for them to keep doing what they've done before,

8:36

but

8:36

just do it faster versus do it with ABM, they're going to do what they've done

8:40

before.

8:40

So you need to start to introduce incentivisations like through the process and

8:45

ways of working,

8:46

not just the net outcome results.

8:47

So that's one option.

8:48

Okay.

8:49

That makes sense.

8:50

And you know, I just had a quick thought on that.

8:53

Like I've never really, as a marketer, were to think, of course, like, what are

8:58

the people

8:58

motivated by especially in sales?

9:00

Money.

9:01

Why don't you align that incentive kind of out of the gate?

9:04

That's like, that's a brilliant, it's obvious, somewhat obvious, but it is an

9:09

obvious, like

9:10

insight almost, Jenna.

9:11

Well, and honestly, it was a bit of an eye opener for me as well, like as a

9:15

career marketer.

9:17

Like we're not as driven by conplans.

9:20

That's not really how we operate.

9:21

So we've just sat down and redone my team's conplans and step one was, okay,

9:26

how do we

9:27

want them to work?

9:28

How do we want them to get after this revenue?

9:30

Not just what's the revenue number, but the how.

9:33

And then we built the conplans against that.

9:35

And, you know, I was guided by our CRO who's been doing this for a long time.

9:39

And I was the same as you.

9:40

I was just like, I've not thought about it this way before, but this just makes

9:42

so much

9:43

sense.

9:44

It does.

9:45

It does.

9:46

And then if we take a look at it is layout the future utopia.

9:50

Yeah.

9:51

So this is like, you know, you can just like appeal to their innate sense of

9:55

what good might

9:56

look like in the future.

9:57

You know, you can go on a bit of an internal education mission, like explain

10:01

the expected

10:02

impact that the ABM program is going to have on ECV and time to close and

10:07

basically get

10:08

them excited about what work in an ABM motion is going to be like for them, as

10:14

opposed to

10:15

what it's going to be like today.

10:18

And basically you just, you just create sheer excitement and will and you do

10:21

loads of enable

10:22

men and you just hope that you've done such a good job of basically selling ABM

10:26

to sales

10:27

people that they've just adopted.

10:31

You can immediately think of all of the, all of the ways that that can go wrong

10:34

And it's one of the reasons that I don't tend to do that often.

10:36

I have seen it done, but I've only really seen it work where you have sales

10:42

people who have

10:43

done ABM in the past, selling it to their peers, which kind of leads me on to

10:48

the third point

10:49

here, which is what I do, which is about finding one or two innovators.

10:54

So you know, you've got that typical bell curve of change.

10:57

You find your early few innovators, then you get your early adopters and then

11:00

you get the

11:00

early majority.

11:02

So your innovators are those sales folks who are, they're open to new ways of

11:07

working.

11:08

So maybe they've done ABM in a previous organization, maybe their personality

11:13

is just like, what

11:14

do I do next?

11:15

Like, why can I do better and how can I do more?

11:20

But you know, for the marketing side of the house, it is easier to get one or

11:24

two folks

11:25

on boarded and fully enabled than it is an entire sales force.

11:29

But then you end up, you know, if you do this well and those early innovators

11:33

see more

11:34

success, you're going to have people knocking down your door, asking why they

11:37

're not part

11:38

of the program and you've managed to kind of affect that change.

11:41

So a bit of a story of how I've done this before.

11:44

So when I was agency side, we had a customer who wanted to move to ABM and it

11:48

was the marketing

11:48

team who wanted to make that move.

11:51

Sales did not.

11:52

It was a sales team about 60 people and we were just like, this is just going

11:55

to be impossible.

11:56

So we need to find an early innovator.

11:59

So we went actually for the most difficult person.

12:01

We found a guy who had retired three times because he was that age.

12:05

He just loves sales so much.

12:06

He just kept coming back to various jobs.

12:09

And we thought, you know, if we can get him on board, we can get anyone on

12:11

board.

12:12

So we kind of set our sights on him as like the pin to topple first.

12:17

And so we did, you know, the full enablement around him.

12:22

We did a discovery session with him on his sales process to just basically

12:26

figure out

12:26

kind of where the gaps were, where the sticking points were.

12:29

And then our entire mission for him was how can we have ABM help you overcome

12:33

the sticking

12:34

points that you're already experiencing.

12:35

So don't try and implicate pain that's not there.

12:38

Figure out what pain is already there and show him how ABM is going to help him

12:42

solve

12:42

for that.

12:43

So for him, he was not getting into deals early enough, like the type of sale

12:47

that he

12:47

was selling into was like, if you are the incumbent, you're basically locked in

12:51

there

12:52

for 10 years.

12:53

And he was not able to sort of get ahead of those sales cycles.

12:56

So the focus for the ABM program for him was focusing on accounts that we knew

13:01

were likely

13:02

to have projects coming up and that he started to engage with them before there

13:06

was an open

13:07

opportunity before there was a sales cycle.

13:09

So he was able to build relationship, become a trusted advisor.

13:13

So I'll tell you a bit more about that story when we go on to talking about the

13:17

account

13:17

plans, which we'll get to later.

13:19

But I could never have been as persuasive as a 60 something year old sales guy

13:25

who everybody

13:26

assumed was stuck in his ways who wouldn't want to do it, go in round all of

13:30

his fears

13:30

and telling them that we'd saved him a year's worth of work on his target

13:34

accounts.

13:35

And that we managed to land him meetings with 80% of his target accounts within

13:38

the first

13:39

six months, like those floodgates just opened.

13:41

And I think by finding your early innovators, like your aim is about creating

13:45

fear of missing

13:46

out.

13:47

And you basically become a magnet for the sales team as opposed to you trying

13:50

to persuade

13:50

them they're coming to you asking for it.

13:52

And that's when you've kind of cracked that internal buy in.

13:56

I love it.

13:57

It reminds me of crossing the chasm, Jeffrey Moore, right?

13:59

You have innovators, early adopters, and then it's like, people need this and

14:02

want this,

14:03

right?

14:04

So it's like, once you do that, everyone in the sales seems like, I need this

14:07

and I want

14:07

this so I can hit my quota, right?

14:09

But like you have to kind of have those, they call it in the book, the

14:13

lighthouse customers,

14:14

the lighthouse logos.

14:16

You need your like lighthouse salespeople almost.

14:18

Yes, yes.

14:19

That is exactly the book that this idea came from.

14:21

That's exactly what that was.

14:22

No, great.

14:23

I love it.

14:24

And actually this slide, let me pull up one more time before we transition to

14:26

the next

14:27

topic for today's conversation.

14:29

This slide is something that I really would recommend like folks use.

14:34

Like you could just take this from Jenna.

14:36

You'll get the slides and recording after this.

14:38

Like, hey, here are three ways we can start making change right now.

14:41

The first one I get, I think is really smart, but not too obvious, but when you

14:45

hear it,

14:45

it's obvious.

14:46

Laying with the future sure, I think that's what a lot of people I think try to

14:49

do.

14:50

This third one is like, I agree, like the thing that's going to really help you

14:54

change

14:54

behavior, salespeople listen and respect other salespeople.

14:57

No offense marketers.

14:58

Look, I'm a marketer.

14:59

Do salespeople really respect me as much?

15:01

Like, no, like the answer is no.

15:05

So yeah, I think getting your buy in from your sales champions around this is

15:10

so, so,

15:11

so important.

15:12

Now, let's talk about this now, Jenna, defining the new ways of working.

15:17

Look, I love snowboarding.

15:18

I ski a bit, but I like snowboarding more.

15:20

And I love again this kind of metaphor and algae you have set up here.

15:25

You know, you're not going to go block diamond right away.

15:28

It's like, and I think it's better than, by the way, the crawl, walk, run stuff

15:31

that

15:32

we always hear.

15:33

I like this one a lot better.

15:34

But yeah, why don't you start unpacking this for us because this starts to get

15:37

into like

15:37

yeah, the charter and the guiding principles.

15:40

Well, I mean, I'll let you in a little secret that this analogy has become a

15:45

bit of a standing

15:46

joke internally because I'm Scottish and I can't ski to save myself.

15:50

And I was telling the team the other day about my one disastrous attempt at

15:53

skiing where I

15:54

did not do these steps.

15:56

I basically decided like I'm from Scotland, I'm going to be innately good at

15:59

this.

16:00

And I just tried to ski and fail horribly and almost killed myself.

16:03

So this is like a constant reminder to self as well.

16:07

Like, buy the right gear.

16:09

This next step.

16:10

So, you know, buy the right gear is getting your sales buy in.

16:12

This next step is basically go to the nursery slope, like get taught how to ski

16:17

before you

16:18

hit a slope and that is about defining these new ways of working.

16:22

So you cannot just have sales and marketing in their own silos, buy into ABM

16:26

and then just

16:27

turn on ABM overnight.

16:29

You now need to talk about how that's going to change how you're going to work

16:32

together.

16:32

So on the next slide, I'm going to flag specifically what we need to talk to

16:39

the sales org about.

16:41

Because again, like you always hear sales marketing alignment and you need to

16:45

work differently

16:46

with ABM and then everything that comes after that are bullets about what

16:49

marketing needs

16:50

to do.

16:51

What about sales?

16:52

Why?

16:53

Why do they need to care?

16:54

What do they need to change?

16:56

So I think the first thing to talk about is the sales cycle.

16:59

So ABM is effectively flipping a sales cycle in its head a lot of the time.

17:05

So quite often you're engaging target counts and conversations with you.

17:09

Some cases it's before they even know that they have a need.

17:12

So if you think back to that guy that I was talking about earlier, if they sold

17:18

financial

17:19

institutions and they were looking for cabling for their data centers, if they

17:25

started to

17:25

build or maybe put their plans together to build a new facility, by that point

17:31

they have

17:32

already thought about who they're going to go to for RFP, probably the people

17:35

they went

17:36

to last time in the built a new bank or a new trading floor.

17:40

So what we needed to do was get him way ahead of that.

17:42

So he needed to start to get in and influence those accounts and become known

17:45

so that the

17:46

next time they're even thinking about an RFP, he was already in their mind.

17:50

And so that's what I mean about flipping that sales cycle is partly about

17:55

making sure that

17:55

you have got relationships established for when a commercial need occurs.

18:01

So a really good thing that you can do here as a sales team together is sit

18:06

down maybe

18:07

with leadership, maybe with marketing in the room and also map what you think

18:11

maybe some

18:11

expected sales cycles might look like with this new way of working.

18:15

Don't let somebody else tell you what your sales cycle needs to be.

18:18

Takes some ownership of it.

18:20

Okay, if I don't have somebody coming inbound asking for a demo, what would I

18:24

do differently

18:25

and how would I engage with them?

18:27

And I say some examples sales cycles because by the inherent nature of ABM they

18:31

will be

18:32

different.

18:33

So mapping out what you think some high level paths and trajectories might look

18:38

like.

18:39

That is where you can then sit down with marketing and say okay, traditionally

18:42

this is our sales

18:43

cycle and how we work together.

18:45

We think that we might have these three different scenarios now when we do ABM.

18:49

So do we have the right content?

18:52

Are you able to help us with any of those stages and basically together figure

18:55

out how

18:55

you're going to work together against this new process in the sales cycle?

19:00

I love this because I'm a huge advocate and believer in creating customer

19:03

journeys,

19:04

using customer engagement data points.

19:06

Once someone becomes a customer.

19:08

In this case, marketing is always trying to create the best customer journey,

19:12

right?

19:13

Like from the top to the bottom of the funnel.

19:15

But in this example, it's not just like the marketing journey.

19:20

It's like no, like here's like the way in which we think we're going to have to

19:24

actually

19:25

engage with people to get them into a conversation that has a chance of closing

19:30

, which selfishly

19:31

sounds very much more people first approach than just saying, hey, the brand is

19:37

going

19:37

to do all these activations and activities to hopefully get someone who's in

19:40

market

19:41

to raise their hand and do it.

19:43

You're taking the customer journey idea, applying it to the sales lands and

19:46

doing it

19:47

upfront and thinking about what the customer journey could look like before it

19:52

even happens.

19:53

Exactly.

19:54

I think about ABM as like way more hand to hand combat.

19:58

It is very kind of like person intensive, especially if you're doing one to one

20:03

If you go to more of a one to many model, it can definitely be a bit more

20:06

marked in light.

20:07

I think one to many ABM and demand gen have become so blurred and blended.

20:13

I'm not even really sure that there's a massive difference these days.

20:16

How sales teams are going to act in a one to many scenarios?

20:19

Probably not too different from what they're doing today.

20:21

But this one to one can be very highly targeted or want to feel like this is

20:25

where this kicks

20:26

in.

20:27

I love it.

20:28

I'll pull the slide back up and we can go into the next one then, which is...

20:33

From Role.

20:35

The metrics that matter.

20:36

Yes.

20:37

Again, if we think about the traditional ways of working between sales and

20:43

marketing in

20:44

a nutshell, it was marketing's job to bring sales leads and it was sales's job

20:48

to close

20:49

them.

20:50

That's all going to go out the window.

20:51

That is not how this is going to work anymore.

20:53

First of all, your ABM leads or qualified opportunities or whatever you decide

20:59

to turn

20:59

that phrase, they are going to be a mixture of inbound and outbound.

21:04

Some of them will come to you through your marketing efforts.

21:07

Some of them you're going to have to go pick up the phone or message on

21:10

LinkedIn or whatever

21:11

it is yourself.

21:13

We cannot start to measure what marketing's given sales and then how it's

21:16

moving through

21:17

the funnel in ABM.

21:19

It's going to be more about...

21:21

Yes, obviously it's going to be a bit revenue.

21:23

Are you generating more and are you doing that faster?

21:26

Do you have more in the pipeline?

21:30

That's a lagging indicator.

21:32

How do you know earlier what's working, what's not working?

21:35

Those leading indicators are going to be things like number of touches with

21:39

your target counts.

21:40

How many engaged stakeholders you have from each of those accounts?

21:43

What's the speed of the sales cycle?

21:45

What is the ACV of that sales cycle?

21:49

Understanding from a sales perspective, especially if you've tied the comp

21:52

plans to this as well,

21:53

you're basically solidifying these new metrics in.

21:59

It's just about understanding what you're going to be measured on, not just as

22:03

a sales

22:03

team, but as an ABM team, because marketing is going to be measured on the same

22:07

things

22:07

as you are.

22:08

Whereas I think sometimes sales and marketing alignment has gone wrong over the

22:12

years, is

22:12

that you're measured on different things.

22:14

It's very hard to become aligned when the CEO is going to waggle his finger or

22:18

her finger

22:18

or her to you or you over different things.

22:21

If you're both responsible for the same set of metrics, it does become a lot

22:24

easier to

22:25

lean around it and become, "No, it's no longer what are you going to do about

22:28

this.

22:28

It's what are we going to do about this?"

22:32

That's the third piece.

22:36

The other piece is basically talking about where the lines are going to be

22:40

between sales

22:41

and marketing, because in all honesty, I think it can become a bit blurry with

22:46

ABM.

22:46

In my experience, sometimes marketing can be reduced to a support function of

22:51

sales,

22:52

or they can go the opposite way and they can get so far into the sales cycle

22:56

that they

22:56

end up doing the job of sales and that experience, that intrinsic experience of

23:01

selling that

23:02

sellers have gets lost for the process.

23:06

I think one of the best things that you can do is then define basically a roles

23:09

and responsibilities

23:10

model very early that sales and marketing both buy into.

23:14

You can capture that in a RACI model if you want, but you just need to make

23:18

sure that

23:19

it's neither side telling the other.

23:20

It's both of you in agreement about how you're going to work together.

23:24

A really good example of this is when I was in-house when I was a morkter.

23:29

This is when we made this move from lead gen to ABM.

23:32

You'll have to excuse me.

23:33

I've got the worst air condition in this room and I've got a very dry throat.

23:37

No, no, no, take your time.

23:38

Yeah, it's a hotel room.

23:40

It's not the best air quality usually in hotels.

23:45

Yeah.

23:46

I was going for the back of my throat.

23:50

So I was on the marketing side.

23:51

My sales counterpart and I sat down and drew clear lines about who was going to

23:58

do in pursuit

23:59

of those accounts that we decided to target together.

24:02

My role was intel and messaging and his role was relationships and basically

24:07

finding the

24:08

commercial in with the accounts.

24:11

So with this approach, we met weekly.

24:13

We shared stories.

24:15

We shared updates, what we'd learned that week.

24:17

And then what was crucial was it wasn't just, hey, here's what I learned.

24:21

Here's what I learned by C next week.

24:23

We would always end that weekly meeting with, okay, how is that going to change

24:26

what we

24:26

do next week?

24:27

Are we going to have to change the messaging?

24:28

Are we going to have to reposition what we think the next meeting is going to

24:32

be like,

24:33

oh, are we going to reach out to this person, to this person?

24:35

Or are we going to call them rather than LinkedIn or whatever it's going to be?

24:39

It was always making sure that we were learning something from each week's

24:42

engagement as opposed

24:43

to just adding another data point to the existing plan and ignoring what we

24:47

needed to change

24:48

in the plan.

24:50

So it really worked for us.

24:52

So we spotted on a press release that Norway's biggest oil and gas producer was

24:56

going to be

24:57

moving for the first time to Scotland.

24:59

They were going to open a HQ in Scotland, which is where we worked.

25:02

And we are, ICP, were oil and gas companies.

25:07

So we put together a whole plan to promote ourselves.

25:10

It was very much about, hey, we are the company, the oil and gas producers

25:15

trust.

25:16

So it was very much like social proofing that all campaign became about their

25:20

peers who

25:21

are already here talking about how much they trusted us and how great we were.

25:24

And that was the entire thing.

25:26

And that was everything from every person who reached out to them and LinkedIn.

25:30

We had a whole team of people reach out and welcome them to the region and

25:32

invite them

25:33

to lunch, tell them good places to go about food.

25:36

It was nothing to do with our tool.

25:37

It was all about establishing relationships.

25:40

All of the ads that we hit them with were all about just basically trust in the

25:45

fact

25:45

that we were very experienced and that 80% of their peers worked with us, et c

25:49

etera,

25:50

et cetera.

25:51

We then paid top dollar for PPC for the messages that we were hitting them with

25:55

in the ads.

25:56

And it worked.

25:57

And we were ready to launch the RFPs.

26:01

We were already connected with a bunch of them.

26:03

We were already multiple people in multiple conversations.

26:06

We were invited to the RFP not only to answer it, but we were invited to help

26:11

shape the document.

26:12

And then surprisingly, we won.

26:14

And we got the business.

26:15

So it was, if Andy and I had not worked together like that, traditional

26:20

marketing would never

26:22

have come up with that because obviously you just can't at scale.

26:25

So that's maybe an example of how you've seen this work together.

26:28

I love that example.

26:29

And also reminds me of it.

26:31

You used at least three, maybe four principles of influence shouting out to

26:37

Robert Chaldini

26:39

in that example.

26:40

Like you used authority, you used reciprocity.

26:47

There was definitely consistency.

26:48

So anyway, that's probably a webinar for another day.

26:51

But I feel like you use techniques that are just so innately, again, people

27:01

first, psychological

27:03

techniques to say, hey, look at us versus throwing your product at the company

27:10

or throwing

27:11

your brain at the company.

27:12

Well, and then I also think, like side tangent and your rights, probably a

27:16

whole other webinar

27:18

is like, that is the really nice thing about ABM.

27:21

Is that you can break out of like the normal way that you do campaigning and

27:25

you can just

27:26

apply a bit of common sense.

27:28

Like, what do we know?

27:29

What do they need to hear?

27:30

What's going to make them feel good?

27:31

And you kind of have like the time and the ability to make that happen.

27:35

I sometimes feel like with mass campaigns, like they're often running and you

27:39

slightly

27:40

lost control of them and they're out and they're happening.

27:41

Whereas this, you're much more, you know, sales is much more of like the

27:45

conductor of

27:46

the whole relationship and they're bringing the right people in and they're

27:49

making sure

27:50

the messages are there and marketing is also reflective of that.

27:54

So that is a target account.

27:56

You just get this very simple, very elegant experience and it just makes you

28:00

feel like

28:01

this becomes a natural choice.

28:02

No, I love that.

28:04

Yeah.

28:05

Nikita says it's a bit of common sense.

28:07

Yeah.

28:08

It's underrated.

28:09

Honestly, like the amount of times we sit down as a team about things and

28:13

Sunday's going

28:14

to be like, hey, are we going to use this methodology or this?

28:16

Do you know, like, I don't know what do they need?

28:18

Like if there's a book about it, like, what would I want to happen and let's do

28:24

that?

28:24

Are you ready to hit the slopes now, Jenna?

28:26

I think so.

28:27

Are you?

28:28

I'm ready.

28:29

Oh, yeah.

28:30

I wish I was on the slopes right now.

28:31

Man, that would be tremendous.

28:32

But we're not.

28:33

You know, it's fine.

28:34

So, yeah, let's go hit the slopes.

28:37

Let's start putting some of this stuff into action.

28:41

So you should see that next slide now and we're moving into the third topic of

28:46

discussion

28:47

today.

28:48

How do you make this very, very practical?

28:51

Yeah.

28:52

Well, exactly.

28:53

So like we've now been chatting for half an hour, but it is so important to

28:56

make sure

28:57

that you've done those first two steps before you start.

29:00

So anything I'm about to speak about from now onwards, if you hadn't done the

29:02

first

29:02

two steps, it's not going to work.

29:04

So this is very much like now it's time to kind of come hit the slope.

29:07

So if you go to the next slide, I basically have like three enablement points

29:12

that I think

29:12

are really important for sales when it comes to ABM.

29:15

So the first one is about making sure that you have got sales involved in

29:20

identifying

29:21

target accounts.

29:22

So there's a bit more detail on the next slide, I think, Mark.

29:25

So you don't want to just hold on just before we do that.

29:27

You don't want to just say, "Hey, sales, here are the accounts we're going

29:31

after?"

29:31

No, you do not.

29:33

And actually, as an agency, like the amount of times that we would have

29:36

customers come

29:36

to us and say, "Oh, hey, we're about to start ABM.

29:40

We'd be like, 'Great, do you have your target account list?'

29:42

And we're like, 'Yeah, sales told us who they want to target.'

29:45

And we would all just sit in like a facepalm and go, 'Oh, no.

29:48

Oh, no, this is just not going to work from the start.'

29:51

So it goes both ways.

29:52

You don't want sales just telling you and you don't want marketing just to tell

29:55

you.

29:55

It's not going to happen.

29:56

Okay.

29:57

Exactly.

29:58

Exactly.

29:59

So we're like, 'It can't be a wish list from sales.'

30:00

And then nine times out of ten, that meant that they would go back and go, '

30:03

Okay, well,

30:03

we'll just tell sales who to target.'

30:05

I'm like, 'No, it's neither.

30:07

It needs to be both of you.'

30:08

So this is what this is all about, is just making sure that you, first of all,

30:15

that you

30:15

have defined your ICP.

30:18

And again, that should be something that both sales and marketing are in the

30:21

room for.

30:22

So ideally, you get to sit with RevOps and do this if you have a large enough

30:26

team.

30:26

That makes things a lot easier.

30:27

There's a lot of data crunching that they can help do.

30:31

But it's basically about finding like, what are the common traits of existing

30:34

customers

30:35

as well as opportunities that have progressed well through your pipeline, not

30:39

just customers?

30:41

Where they have basically spotted patterns in what makes a good fit customer

30:49

there.

30:50

So I always think that the key to a really great ICP is almost like a two-tier

30:56

ICP, a

30:57

bit like a sales process.

30:58

One is qualification and one is discovery.

31:01

So at the qualification level, it's basic math, it's firmographics.

31:05

Are they this size?

31:06

Do they have this revenue?

31:07

Are they in this geo, et cetera, et cetera?

31:09

It's a bit more binary.

31:10

And that's just pure qualification.

31:12

Like, could they be a good customer or could they not?

31:15

Yes, no, divide.

31:16

And then off those groups that could be a good customer, what are those more

31:20

intrinsic

31:21

things, things like behaviors that you can't necessarily see just by looking

31:24

like on a

31:24

balance sheet or looking at their annual report.

31:29

So you can find tools, there are loads of them out there to help you find

31:34

companies that

31:35

fit your ICP.

31:36

And that's going to help you create your total address goal or total relevant

31:41

market.

31:41

And from there, you're going to want to find your best bets.

31:44

And that's where the second tier of almost like the discovery across that total

31:48

relevant

31:49

market kicks in.

31:50

So who are those accounts that you're going to pull into your ABM program?

31:54

And this is where sales marketing together can be incredibly powerful.

31:57

So you've got your third party and sometimes even your first party data points

32:04

from marketing.

32:05

So things like third party intent, web visits, how accounts are engaging with

32:11

your content

32:12

and how they're engaging with your marketing campaigns.

32:15

But it's also so important to also have what sales know about those accounts.

32:21

Like what conversations have they had?

32:23

Who do they know over there?

32:24

Who, which partners do we have that we know that have got ends over there where

32:28

we can

32:29

start to understand not just are they a good fit on paper and are they showing

32:32

the right

32:33

behaviors, but are they actually willing to engage in a conversation and blend

32:37

all of

32:38

those insights together to help you figure out who your target accounts should

32:43

be.

32:43

A really great way to bring that sales insights is to maybe use a tool like G

32:48

ONG where you're

32:48

not relying on a sales person remembering 50 conversations that they've had

32:52

over the

32:52

last two years, you're able to like scrape all of your code data or all your

32:56

recording

32:57

data and start to like pull out patterns and things.

32:59

That's where somebody in RedWops can really help with that element as well.

33:04

Yeah, with machine learning now, there's a lot of AI tools, even GONG might

33:07

have one

33:08

inside their platform now natively built that allows you to like literally say,

33:13

all right,

33:13

out of this data set of this many calls, this is what I want to know.

33:18

How many of our calls or like not even how many?

33:21

What are the top three problems that are heard most often in all of our calls?

33:26

Who are asking those problems?

33:28

What, literally, you could just ask the data set through conversational

33:33

interface now,

33:35

those questions.

33:37

It's super powerful and I love your whole thing around like I call it like fit

33:41

and you

33:41

use that word fit versus intent.

33:43

What's the fit of the account versus the intent of the account or really the

33:46

intent of the

33:47

buyers in that account?

33:48

Exactly.

33:49

Exactly.

33:50

I could fan girl about GONG all day long.

33:54

GONG engage is a new module that they have and I think that we're all about to

33:59

become

34:00

like supercharged versions of ourselves with that because the things that we'd

34:03

have taken

34:03

us weeks to do, we're just going to get the answers to.

34:06

And that's what I really like about the use of how GONG in particular has gone

34:10

about

34:11

AI is it's all about kind of helping us do our jobs better.

34:14

It's not about replacing anything, it's just about helping us be more

34:17

efficiently, we

34:17

have more insights.

34:20

And then okay, so then you figured out basically all of the accounts that you

34:23

want to pull into

34:23

your ABM program and then you need to remember that not all accounts are

34:27

created equal.

34:28

So you ideally want to have a blend of accounts that are maybe showing buying

34:33

behaviors right

34:34

now versus those that are more like those quite well accounts that you want to

34:38

go after.

34:38

And so you're basically looking for a blended model across various tiers.

34:43

So you know, the way that that tends to come up in ABM is who's going to be in

34:46

your one-to-one

34:47

campaigns versus your one-to-many versus your one-to-two.

34:50

So like your one-to-one accounts are going to get the white glove treatment,

34:53

the one-to-few

34:53

accounts are going to be put into a cluster, they're going to be treated like a

34:55

really

34:56

tiny market.

34:57

And then maybe accounts that are a good fit, but they're not necessarily

35:01

showing the most

35:02

amount of intent at the moment, but there's definitely something there.

35:04

You maybe wrap them into a one-to-many program.

35:08

So after everybody has agreed on the target accounts, the sales team should

35:13

then take

35:13

lead on creating account plans, especially for those one-to-one and one-to-few

35:18

accounts,

35:19

which I've neatly led myself onto my second enablement point of that.

35:24

Now, this is super important.

35:28

I can't wait to get your perspective on this.

35:30

So we just flipped to the next slide where Jenna has laid out a few more

35:33

details of these

35:34

target account plans.

35:35

I have seen this done well.

35:37

I wouldn't say amazing.

35:39

And I've seen this not done at all.

35:41

I would argue that if you don't do this at all, I don't think ABM will be super

35:46

effective.

35:47

I mean, you could do all the other stuff, but if you don't take the time to

35:52

truly hone

35:53

in on an account and study it and understand how to go after it and how to

36:00

engage with

36:01

it and what makes it a viable, high-ACV account, and it's basically trying to

36:11

play a game

36:12

without any preparation.

36:13

You know what I mean, Jenna?

36:15

I don't know.

36:16

It's like never going on the bunny slope, just trying to go down the black

36:19

diamond.

36:20

Yeah, well, like me, like a fool, exactly.

36:24

Well, this, I think where I see people with good intentions and where it goes

36:31

wrong is

36:31

that people will put together very detailed research dossies on each of their

36:36

target accounts

36:36

and they will understand to the nth degree everything about that account, which

36:41

is brilliant.

36:42

And you should absolutely do that if you have the time and the resources and if

36:45

not, do

36:45

a cut down version of that.

36:47

But they don't do what you just mentioned was that, okay, but how do we use

36:50

that information?

36:52

What does that mean for how we go after them?

36:54

How do we, I don't even know if there's a phrase for this, but go to market to

36:57

one account,

36:58

go to account.

37:00

Like how do we do that, given all the information that we have today?

37:04

And that is what these account plans should do.

37:07

That is a blow to account.

37:08

I don't think I've ever heard that term, but that makes a lot of sense.

37:11

Well, I just made it up.

37:13

Maybe we should coin it.

37:14

You go to account plan.

37:16

You go to account plan.

37:17

Yeah.

37:18

Make it a thing.

37:19

And this is where I think a lot of sales people start to feel a bit more in the

37:22

drive

37:22

and seat and a bit more comfortable again, because sales folks are used to

37:25

putting together

37:26

plans.

37:27

There are normally deal plans for opportunities that already exist in pipeline.

37:31

And so this is really, it's exactly the same, but there are two key differences

37:36

One is that we're starting earlier.

37:38

So before there is an open opportunity.

37:40

And the second is that the plan should be from the perspective of the target

37:44

account,

37:44

as opposed to from our perspective.

37:47

And if you make sure that your entire target account plan is written from the

37:50

perspective

37:51

of the target account, you are not going to be able to help but make your

37:54

touches personal

37:55

and consistent and meaningful for them.

37:59

It's just, if you read through your target account plans that you have today, I

38:03

almost

38:03

guarantee they're going to be written from your perspective, not from their

38:06

perspective.

38:06

Make that flip and put it in their perspective.

38:09

And suddenly you're messaging your content, what to say to the next, all

38:11

becomes a lot

38:12

cleaner at that point.

38:14

That way, yes, and hot.

38:15

Yes.

38:16

Well, that will be a clip from this webinar for sure.

38:19

No, that's really interesting.

38:22

Yeah, unpacked is a bit more for everyone than, yeah, like, yeah, this is very

38:26

important,

38:27

I feel like.

38:28

Yeah.

38:29

So then, so things that I think are very important to go into these, these

38:33

account

38:34

plans are making sure that you have uncovered a North Star metric that you're

38:38

selling against,

38:40

because ABM is about creating long-term profitable relationships.

38:44

It's not about getting to that first signature.

38:46

It is about, you know, five years from now, are you still a great partnership

38:49

together?

38:50

So making sure, like, what is very important to them?

38:53

So I always have my sales team put together these account plans and they are

38:58

always identifying

39:00

six months post the first signature.

39:03

What is going to make that economic buyer, that decision maker, the CEO, super

39:07

happy

39:07

that they made the decision to go with us?

39:09

Like, what metric has moved by how much in what timeframe, like make it time-

39:14

bound, make

39:15

it like an actual number that measurable.

39:19

And that becomes, you know, such a key part of this target account plan.

39:23

And you know, the usual sales process applies here, like, don't take the first

39:27

answer, keep

39:28

digging, keep asking why, keep getting further and further into that.

39:31

You know, what they think they need to measure might not quite be right, you

39:33

know, maybe they're

39:34

measuring against a symptom rather than the cause.

39:37

So make sure that you get kind of get down to that proper cause.

39:40

The next part is about a decision making unit map.

39:44

So before, obviously, you start to engage the account, you're going to be a bit

39:47

limited

39:47

on what you can put in there.

39:48

And the whole point of these account plans is that they should be living,

39:51

breathing documents.

39:52

You shouldn't just write them and leave them in a digital shelf.

39:55

You should be constantly adapting them.

39:57

So you're only going to really be able to put things like job titles and who

40:00

works for

40:01

who at the start.

40:03

But as you start to engage the account, you start to get into more conversation

40:06

with

40:06

them.

40:07

You're going to be able to evolve them up to become, okay, what do each of

40:10

these people

40:11

care about?

40:12

What are they personally being measured against and how does that layer up to

40:15

that North Star

40:15

metrics?

40:16

So you're making a link between the people and the business objective.

40:20

Another thing that I think is really useful to capture are things like, what is

40:24

their

40:24

personality?

40:25

Like, how do they like to be communicated with, you know, who gets on with who,

40:28

who will listen

40:29

to who, who's in competition that you should never have tried to make decisions

40:32

together

40:33

because they're always going to beat each other, stuff like that becomes

40:36

invaluable

40:36

if your target account is one account and you don't know those interactions.

40:41

You can get lost for six months in some internal politics because you didn't

40:45

navigate your

40:45

way around that.

40:46

So, you know, it sounds like a very flippant thing to put on there, but it's

40:49

actually really

40:50

important.

40:51

There's another tool that I've used before that I find really helpful before

40:55

you engage

40:55

with stakeholders.

40:56

It's called crystal nose.

40:58

Oh, yeah.

40:59

Yes.

41:00

That's excellent and that basically sits on top of their LinkedIn profile and

41:04

like gives

41:05

you personality typing and gives you tips and tricks for communication styles

41:09

for people.

41:10

So before you go into that first meeting, I find it very helpful to have a

41:13

quick look

41:13

on crystal nose and just get an idea of the type of people I'm going into meet

41:18

with.

41:19

I always make sure that the team have got current state listed out on the

41:22

account plan.

41:23

So how are they going about solving the problem that you're hoping to solve

41:27

today?

41:27

Is it working?

41:28

What could be improved?

41:29

What pains are they feeling?

41:31

And then really vitally, how does your current state stack up against that

41:35

North Star metric?

41:36

If you keep doing what you're doing today, are you going to hit that North Star

41:39

metric?

41:39

And if the answer is no, great.

41:41

You've implemented enough, implicated enough pain, like from a mid-air

41:45

perspective, that

41:47

they know that they need to do something about it.

41:51

Then finally, where are they investing?

41:53

So are they, you know, where are the flagship project?

41:57

Have they made any acquisitions?

41:59

Do you know about their tech purchases, especially if you're a tech company,

42:02

been able to know

42:03

their existing tech landscape?

42:06

Is that going to block you out of the account?

42:07

Can you integrate some of their techs?

42:08

Or if they just bought a competitor of yours and they're locked in for three

42:11

years, they

42:12

might be a perfect target account, but you're never going to sell to them.

42:14

So you should demo them and put someone else into your AVM program.

42:19

So those are the highlights in the high level sections.

42:23

I think we need to go into those account plans.

42:25

I love it.

42:26

I'll pull up one more time.

42:27

So I mean, just take a quick look at it.

42:29

If you want to take a screenshot, feel free again.

42:30

You'll get the slides after the fact.

42:33

You'll get the recording.

42:34

It's all going to be in the tech network and Club PF.

42:37

But those five things, North Star, decision making, unit map, current state,

42:42

places where

42:43

they're going to invest in a tech stack.

42:45

I love crystal nodes, by the way.

42:47

I forgot about that tool.

42:48

Highly recommend it.

42:49

Thank you for bringing that up, Jenna.

42:51

Yeah, I am obsessed.

42:55

I was a bit unsure how accurate it would be.

43:00

So the first thing I did when I got it was I put it on top of my profile and it

43:04

was like

43:05

holding the mirror up to myself.

43:07

What it's that back, I was like, yep, that's me.

43:11

Yeah.

43:12

It's like the dis...

43:13

It's a personality.

43:14

It's not so much behavior, but it's definitely more personality.

43:16

Yeah, it's a...

43:17

Myers brings whatever you want to call it.

43:19

Yeah.

43:20

Exactly.

43:21

Exactly.

43:22

And then the third and final enablement point then for sales when it comes to

43:27

ABM is around

43:28

data, being able to kind of read it and know what to do with it because

43:32

everywhere that

43:33

people speak about ABM, they're always talking about data first and data led

43:37

and there's

43:38

a lot of triggers from data that help marketing, but salespeople are left going

43:43

, I've just been

43:44

inundated with a whole bunch of data and there's actually not much insight from

43:47

it.

43:48

It's just a bunch of stuff and they just don't know what to do.

43:52

I think the first thing is making sure that your sales team is aware that you

43:58

need to

43:59

be able to spot engagement with your target accounts because obviously you're

44:01

not looking

44:02

for the Kabbukah demo or a lead.

44:04

So what does engagement look like and work with marketing so that you know what

44:07

that

44:07

signal looks like so that you know what you're looking out for?

44:10

So something is happening and if you have a tool in place, you'll get some sort

44:13

of trigger

44:14

or alert, but if you don't have a tool and you're doing it manually, there are

44:17

still

44:17

many, many things that you can look for that it implies that an account is

44:21

starting to

44:22

engage with you.

44:22

Sorry, just because you've started to see that engagement does not mean it's

44:29

time for sales

44:30

to start blindly calling, emailing, messaging those accounts at semi-regular

44:34

interval and

44:35

hope that they can just nurture them into submission.

44:39

The whole point of this data is about is meeting them where they are.

44:43

So are they only showing third party intent?

44:48

If that's true, then they're probably solution, they're problem aware, but they

44:52

're not solution

44:53

aware and they're certainly not brand aware.

44:56

So you and marketing might want to work together to start to make them brand

45:00

aware and that

45:01

might be the next step that you take there.

45:03

Maybe they're coming to your site and they're not doing anything more than that

45:06

So how many people are coming to your site?

45:08

How often are they coming to your site?

45:10

What are they spending time reading?

45:12

And therefore, what do you need to get them to do next to move on to that next

45:16

stage?

45:16

So that's kind of one of these keys to data is to read the data for ABM is

45:21

understand where

45:22

they are and what the next action is that you want them to take as opposed to

45:26

when can

45:27

I call them?

45:28

It's not about that anymore.

45:29

It's about kind of like, okay, you're a, how'd you get them to be?

45:32

They're d great.

45:33

How'd you get them to e and it's just constantly helping accounts move along

45:37

and move along.

45:38

There's a flip site to the data point though, which is about personalized

45:42

messaging and

45:43

content.

45:44

So again, that often gets interpreted as what messaging are we going to put in

45:48

our ads and

45:49

what content will marketing produce.

45:52

But actually where sales teams can really excel as if they can take the data on

45:57

an account,

45:58

understand where they are and where they need them to move next.

46:01

That helps them craft the most personalized messaging for outreach or future

46:06

calls or

46:07

for the next account that they're, or for the next meeting that they're going

46:09

to get

46:09

into because that account feels like the vendors then in lockstep with them.

46:14

So two quick stories about this and then I'll around this side.

46:18

So the first thing is my team and what they do today is they prep for their

46:21

meetings by

46:22

looking at all of those engagement triggers and all of those data points.

46:25

So they'll maybe had one conversation with the account.

46:28

They'll have agreed the agenda for the next one.

46:30

They will always cover off the agenda they've agreed with, but they will also

46:33

look at all

46:34

of the engagement data and they will figure out what else the account cares

46:37

about and

46:38

they will naturally bring that up through the course of the second call.

46:42

And the people who are on the receiving end keeps saying, oh my goodness, yeah,

46:45

actually

46:46

we are talking about that.

46:47

And how did you know that?

46:48

And just it makes them feel seen, which is very vital for that relationship

46:53

building.

46:54

The other side of that is maybe before you're in a conversation with them, so

46:57

social selling.

46:59

So using that data to segment and prioritize within your target accounts.

47:04

Map your messaging to their pain points and challenges that the data is telling

47:08

you that

47:08

they have.

47:09

Being able to then take that messaging and making it persona specific and then

47:14

reaching

47:14

out via social selling.

47:16

I did that for a client once when I was agency side and we added 1.2 million to

47:20

their pipeline

47:21

in six weeks, which was just phenomenal.

47:24

And one, I think the key was all of the messaging was written based on the data

47:28

, but then sales

47:30

and marketing wrote those messages together.

47:32

So marketing didn't write a fluffy marketing message for sales to send and

47:35

sales didn't

47:36

try to sell.

47:37

Together they came to the perfect kind of just start a conversation message.

47:41

And it was just, I've never seen results like it was game changing.

47:45

I love that.

47:46

That's really smart around.

47:50

Yeah, I mean, not all signals of engagement are equal.

47:55

It's kind of a lesson right there to sum it up.

47:59

And then when you think about preparing to go down the slope, to go down the

48:07

slope, it's

48:08

not just about the practice, but it's almost maybe not just in time, you know,

48:14

research.

48:15

But if you do it that day or the day before, using the signals to understand

48:21

where the

48:22

buying team is right now, since you've last talked to them or since you last

48:26

tried to

48:27

reach out to them.

48:28

Exactly, exactly.

48:29

Like we had one, it was actually a Monday, one of my team messages in the

48:33

morning and

48:33

he was like, oh, I'll have a conversation this afternoon and all conversations

48:37

to date have

48:38

been about ads and we were about to close a deal.

48:41

But actually this morning, they have been all over the site looking at our chat

48:45

bot feature.

48:46

I'm going to bring that up as well.

48:47

And I was like, go ahead, go forth.

48:50

And they were like actually because it hadn't been mentioned in the sales cycle

48:53

, we didn't

48:53

know that you had one, but we were looking at one anyway.

48:56

So could we do both?

48:57

Yes.

48:58

And a totally different sales cycle, which wouldn't have happened if all we'd

49:01

done is

49:01

just take the agenda from last call.

49:03

So to that point, for that just in time research, like it does change the

49:08

trajectory of deals.

49:09

No, I love that.

49:11

Folks, we're wrapping up.

49:12

If you have any questions, we can stay on for another five minutes.

49:14

Jenna has generously also given you folks some resources, which you'll have in

49:19

the follow-up

49:20

as well.

49:21

But there's a great ebook you've identified in a course that you guys have to

49:24

from the

49:25

Terminus website that people can check out to go deeper.

49:28

So the course is completely free.

49:30

It's a bit of a time investment.

49:32

It takes about seven or eight hours.

49:33

It's not quick, but I had done EBM for quite a long time before I took it.

49:37

I had to do it as part of my onboarding and I was a bit snobby about it.

49:40

I was like, I don't need this.

49:41

I've done EBM for a long time and I took it and I took a lot of notes.

49:44

It's actually really good.

49:45

So highly, highly recommend.

49:48

And then I've left my LinkedIn on the next slide.

49:51

So if you guys want to not have a conversation here, if you want to follow up

49:56

with any of

49:57

the points that this will come out, not about Terminus, but just about sales

50:02

and EBM, then

50:02

more than happy for you to connect.

50:04

Let me actually just copy this link right now and I'll drop it in the chat for

50:11

everyone

50:12

so you can connect with Jenna right now on LinkedIn.

50:16

Big thank you, Jenna.

50:17

Folks, if there's any questions, like I said, we have about four minutes or so.

50:21

We're right on time.

50:23

Fantastic content.

50:24

Thank you so much for this.

50:26

I learned a couple things today, which is always the goal.

50:30

When you go to any of these types of webinars or you consume any content, does

50:34

it teach you

50:35

something?

50:36

I think that's kind of like the watermark, right?

50:39

So hopefully you folks learn some stuff.

50:41

Sam, you're welcome.

50:42

Jenna, any last, you could say key takeaway or anything you want to leave

50:49

everyone with?

50:51

No, I mean, I'm glad if it's been useful.

50:54

You're all welcome.

50:55

I sit through a lot of webinars and I get so frustrated if I get to the end and

50:59

I'm like,

51:00

"Oh, that was just so high level.

51:01

There's nothing I can take away from that."

51:03

So hopefully there was at least one or two nuggets.

51:05

I've had a really good time.

51:06

This is a great chat.

51:07

Thank you, Mark.

51:08

Yeah, no, thank you, everyone.

51:09

Hope you have a great rest of your day.

51:11

Again, if you're listening to the recording, thank you for taking the time to

51:14

do so.

51:15

Check out more resources on the TAC network.

51:17

Terminus, of course, has a ton of things about a company's marketing, a company

51:21

selling,

51:22

check out terminus.com.

51:23

And folks, we'll see you at the next one.

51:25

It's in a couple of weeks, end of June.

51:27

Talk to you soon.

51:28

Thanks again, Jenna.

51:29

Thanks, bye.

51:30

Bye. [BLANK_AUDIO]

X

This is a test comment.

X

This is a longer test comment to see how this looks if the person decides to ramble a bit. So they're rambling and rambling and then they even lorem ipsum.


author