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Nick Bennett 57 min

Unlock the Secrets of Content-Led Growth: Transform Your Marketing Funnel


Join Cassie and Mark in our webinar to explore Content-Led Growth strategies that can turn your marketing content into a customer-conversion engine.



0:00

Hey, what's going on?

0:04

Hope you're doing well today.

0:06

Thanks for joining us live.

0:07

And if you're listening to the recording, hope you enjoy this.

0:11

Very excited about this month's club PF webinar.

0:16

I have a very special guest with us today.

0:19

She'll do an introduction in just a moment.

0:23

This month's webinar is all about content-led growth.

0:28

One of my favorite topics, probably because I spent a lot of time in HubSpot, a

0:33

lot of

0:34

time in the inbound marketing ecosystem, evangelizing inbound marketing.

0:38

Look, I love inbound marketing, but I do feel inbound marketing and also

0:43

content marketing,

0:45

which sometimes those terms are used synonymously, needs to change.

0:50

And that's why I'm very bullish on this idea of content-led growth.

0:53

And Cassie, who's the CEO of Campfire Labs, is also very bullish on this as

0:58

well.

0:59

And we're going to unpack the whole thing for you today.

1:01

We'll get to the agenda in just a moment, but Cassie, welcome and please do an

1:06

intro.

1:07

Thanks, Mark.

1:08

It's so lovely to be here with you all.

1:09

Yeah, as Mark said, I'm the CEO of Campfire Labs.

1:13

We are an agency, a content agency who focus on long-form narrative content,

1:17

interview-driven

1:19

content.

1:20

It sort of feels like, well, we try and make it feel like magazine-style

1:23

journalism, but

1:23

written for a B2B SaaS audience.

1:26

It's really, we've got an amazing team, amazing group of writers, we're growing

1:30

So that's really cool.

1:31

Before I came to Campfire, I joined last year, I was at Animals Content Agency

1:35

for five years,

1:37

started out as a level one writer and moved up to be VP of people or ops by the

1:43

end.

1:43

I can't quite remember.

1:44

It changed a couple of times.

1:46

And before that, I was at a B2B SaaS company, a prototyping tool in Barcelona

1:50

where I'm

1:51

based.

1:52

Love it.

1:53

Love it.

1:54

Well, welcome.

1:55

I'm so glad to have you as a partner of tax and then doing this club P.F.

1:58

We have it all together.

1:59

I'm going to drop the link to the slides one more time.

2:01

You can get the slides in the recording if you're listening live right now

2:05

inside a

2:05

club P.F.

2:06

You can sign up for a free account if you don't already have one.

2:09

Clubpeoplefirst.com, but let's get right into the agenda.

2:13

Just as a quick reminder.

2:15

We do one of these every month or so.

2:16

The next one is happening in just about a month of now rethinking the lead to

2:20

opportunity

2:21

experience with Natalie from Nevada.

2:23

If you know Natalie, you know it's going to be a good one just like this one.

2:27

We're going to talk about how you can change the buying experience when someone

2:30

becomes

2:31

a lead to hopefully when they become an opportunity using things like

2:36

interactive demos, using

2:37

things like people first sequences to make that buying experience much more

2:44

aligned to

2:44

how people like to buy things today.

2:46

I'll leave it at that and then we've another one a few weeks after that.

2:50

Check them out.

2:51

I'll throw the link to the webinar page as well in the chat.

2:54

Cassie, you want to go through what we're going to cover today and how we're

2:57

going to

2:58

make this super educational?

2:59

Yeah, thank you so much, Mark.

3:01

Today, Mark and I are going to tag team on talking about some of our real

3:05

experiences

3:06

with executing some of the highest performing content like growth campaigns on

3:11

some of the

3:11

fastest growing SaaS companies, not to tutor our own home, but there you go,

3:16

two, two.

3:17

So we'll be walking through the definition of content like growth with those

3:20

real examples.

3:20

We've got some frameworks and some first principles for running content like

3:25

growth campaigns.

3:27

And then towards the end, we'll share a multi-step workflow for creating your

3:30

first content like

3:31

growth asset and some share some thoughts on measurement because that can be a

3:35

tricky

3:35

aspect of this.

3:36

We'll have time for questions at the end and discussion or you can drop them in

3:40

the chat

3:40

and we'll try to field them as we go, try to multitask that.

3:44

Yeah, I'm very good at running webinars, doing multiple things at once.

3:48

So feel free to Cassie's point and drop your questions, your comments, your

3:53

ideas for everyone

3:54

else listening, listening live into the chat.

3:56

Let's make it super interactive and let's kick it off with the definition.

4:02

And if you folks have a definition for content like growth that you've been

4:05

using, we'd

4:05

love to hear it in the chat too.

4:07

But this is how Cassie and I have defined it.

4:10

So I'm going to have you unpack it first.

4:13

Thanks, Hark.

4:15

We tried to keep this definition simple and clear.

4:17

I'd love to hear your thoughts on it.

4:19

Content like growth for us is the act of creating, amplifying and measuring

4:24

content

4:24

across the buyer customer journey with the goal of generating net new and

4:29

retained revenue.

4:31

So in content like growth, each asset is planned with the specific aim of being

4:36

activated

4:36

across a variety of owned and non-owned channels.

4:39

That means one asset needs to be able to be recycled into many channels.

4:45

And each of these assets is created with not just for your target audience,

4:50

buyer or customer.

4:51

That's probably one of my favorite differentiators there.

4:54

Love this definition.

4:55

Yes, the width, your audience is super important.

4:58

You know, a lot of times content marketing, first off, you think of it as top

5:02

of funnel

5:03

or just an overall marketing activity Cassie.

5:07

Content like growth, it should not just be a marketing activity.

5:09

It should include salespeople, customer success folks, subject matter experts

5:13

across the company.

5:15

But definitely to your point about building content with other people, not for

5:18

other people.

5:19

It should include perspectives from your customers, people that are thought

5:23

leaders are trusted,

5:25

influencers in the space that you're selling into, your ICP, your industry,

5:30

your market

5:31

overall.

5:32

It should be something that's extremely collaborative and it should be thought

5:36

of as a way to take

5:38

the brand's story and point of view and the messaging and positioning that

5:43

product marketing

5:44

typically is responsible for.

5:46

And getting it into the minds and hearts of people in ways that feel very

5:52

natural, not

5:53

forced, not like in the 10 or so, maybe 15 years ago, it's like, hey, here's a

5:58

white

5:58

paper.

5:59

The company created it.

6:01

It's our point of view, but includes no perspective from anyone else.

6:05

And it's used just as a part of this very narrow minded, maybe lead acquisition

6:14

part

6:14

of the funnel.

6:15

So it's much more strategic.

6:17

And that's why I like content like growth versus just like content marketing

6:20

and marketing.

6:21

It's a strategic growth motion that spans the entire kind of go to market

6:25

function.

6:26

And to your point, Cassie, it's the entire customer journey.

6:30

You know, and you create this nice little flywheel using the three verbs.

6:34

We love verbs to define things for people.

6:37

So yeah, let's unpack this now.

6:38

And actually, hold on, before you do that, Andrew, does that answer your

6:42

question around

6:42

how does this differ from content marketing?

6:44

I'd love to know if it does or doesn't because I think Cassie and you and I've

6:47

talked a

6:47

lot about like content marketing, content and growth, there's definitely a

6:52

debate.

6:54

And we do have a slide that compares what we conceptualize as traditional

6:58

content marketing

6:59

with content-led growth.

7:02

And maybe we can pause on that slide and have you share a little bit more,

7:05

Andrew, about

7:07

where you would like to see more differentiation or how you think they're the

7:10

same.

7:10

But we'll definitely dig into what we think is different.

7:12

I think the starting point might be maybe our conceptualizations of traditional

7:16

content

7:17

marketing are different from Andrew's.

7:20

But maybe we can get into that on that slide.

7:21

I'd definitely like to address that.

7:25

So we wanted to share this as a starting point, this framework that Mark and I

7:29

like to use,

7:31

which we call the create, amplify and measure framework.

7:34

And we use this when we're ideating and executing on an asset for a content-led

7:38

campaign.

7:40

If we start with create at the top of the flywheel, the creation, ideation and

7:45

creation

7:45

process is different in content-led growth because it brings the target

7:49

audience right

7:50

in on the ground floor, which is what Mark was just talking about.

7:53

You bring your target audience in at the ideation stage of content creation.

7:59

So in a content-led growth campaign, you might have a hypothesis around an idea

8:03

for

8:03

an asset that will work.

8:05

And you share that hypothesis with members of your target audience.

8:08

Maybe that means your customers, your prospects, maybe it means folks who are

8:11

in your ICP.

8:12

And you have them validate it.

8:14

And we can talk about different ways to do that.

8:17

Or even co-ideate it with you.

8:18

I know we've done sessions where we're like spitballing with people in the ICP

8:22

to get

8:23

to that idea for the asset.

8:26

Then once you've got that idea in your validated it, you'll also pull them into

8:29

the actual

8:29

creation stage through interviews and even reviews of your core ideas and

8:34

frameworks.

8:35

On the next side, Mark will maybe talk a little bit about how he did that with

8:37

a real

8:38

example of that sharing a core idea or framework with people.

8:45

If we move on to amplify on the right hand side, in content-led growth,

8:49

everyone is

8:50

a content marketer.

8:52

What I mean by that is everyone involved in the content should be incentivized

8:56

to amplify

8:57

that content.

8:58

And so that is customers, prospects, interviewees, and of course you're in-

9:04

house team.

9:05

So it's a big difference from maybe how some of us did things in the past where

9:09

we had

9:10

two people on the content team tweeting out tweets about an asset we've created

9:16

In content-led growth, we want to amplify through everyone who's touched the

9:19

content

9:19

on its way to creation.

9:22

I appreciate that some of you might be thinking, "Oh, yeah, right.

9:26

I'm never going to be able to get the dev team or the product team or whoever

9:30

to share content

9:31

in an organic way."

9:32

And I agree that's definitely a challenge.

9:35

Mark and I will share some lessons or some examples of what we've learned on

9:40

incentivizing

9:41

people to do amplification.

9:43

Mark, did you want to speak a little bit to measure?

9:47

Yeah, I'm happy to.

9:48

And this is definitely one where I think Andrew, there is a difference.

9:52

Content marketers don't typically think, at least I think, in the idea of how

9:58

do we

9:58

use content and the signals of engagement in a way to grow revenue?

10:06

I think great content marketers do, right?

10:08

But I feel like the majority of people creating content definitely should do

10:12

step one and two

10:14

here.

10:15

You've got to create for the right people, for the right reasons, and you've

10:17

got to figure

10:18

out how to get the content to the people's...

10:21

I guess you could say screens at the end of the day or heads.

10:27

But how do you use then the engagement from the content?

10:33

So the classic example is like, well, the only engagement signal we have is

10:37

someone downloads

10:38

it with a form.

10:39

That's very narrow-minded, right?

10:41

I think that's the traditional in-bout marketing definition, right?

10:44

You create content, you put on a landing page, you gate it, there's a form,

10:47

there's a signal,

10:48

right?

10:49

But with content and growth, there's tons of different ways to create

10:52

engagement signals

10:52

that can be then fed into a tool, into an algorithm that then allows your SDRAE

11:00

team

11:00

to better follow up and personalize and serve up the next piece of content.

11:05

And that's where measurement comes in.

11:06

So it starts with the engagement signals.

11:08

There's a lot of discussion about signal-based sales these days, signal-based

11:13

marketing.

11:13

That is a key aspect that's different for me.

11:16

And then it's also about how do you measure the impact of content, your point,

11:20

Cassie,

11:20

on pipeline and revenue and adoption.

11:24

And it's not just about content for the sake of creating leads or MQLs.

11:27

Sure, I mean, that's a leading indicator, but it's how well does a particular

11:31

piece

11:31

of content drive revenue for the business?

11:36

And how do you use that content in places outside of just marketing?

11:41

So yeah, I mean, let's see, we got actually Andrew, very thoughtful commentary.

11:46

Seems like a more market-oriented approach to content marketing strategy,

11:49

defining content

11:50

marketing strategy as exactly.

11:52

I'm not going to read everything that you put in the chat, but yeah, I

11:55

definitely like

11:56

what you put here.

11:57

Cassie, let us know what you think as well.

12:00

And actually the next example is a great one.

12:02

So this is a customer that we've worked on together.

12:06

They're SUGO, they're an event technology company.

12:11

We said, look, what is SUGO's product?

12:15

What is its product differentiation?

12:17

What does it believe event technology needs to go?

12:21

What is its brand promise and brand story?

12:25

And how do we design a very strategic asset, the event maturity model, so that

12:33

it can become

12:34

a cornerstone asset for how they use content to grow revenue, content like

12:39

growth?

12:40

So the best content we believe, Cassie and I believe, is about helping someone

12:46

get to

12:47

an outcome.

12:48

Yes, it could be educational, entertainment, inspiration, motivating, but it's

12:52

like, what

12:52

is that doing to help you get to an outcome?

12:55

Selfishly either as an employee at a business or as a person on a team at a

13:01

business, but

13:02

how do you design the content with the outcome first?

13:06

And in this example, the event maturity model, each of these stages is designed

13:09

to help someone

13:10

get to a different outcome.

13:12

So what we did is we said, great, aligning this to everything I said about at

13:16

the brand

13:16

and product level, how do you then turn this into this ultimate guide?

13:22

We did a virtual event, we're creating video clips from it, we're actually

13:25

creating another

13:26

tool, a free tool that's going to tee people up to become aware of the maturity

13:32

model more

13:32

at the top of the funnel.

13:34

So this is just an example of something that's extremely strategic from a

13:37

golden market

13:38

standpoint.

13:39

And we've created a content strategy from that, and then we're going to use

13:43

these signals

13:44

of engagement across all these things, the virtual event, the guide, the video

13:48

clips,

13:49

and give those signals to the right people to say, look, you might want to

13:55

follow up

13:55

with these leads, if you will, these buyers, because they're showing this type

14:00

of intent.

14:01

I'll pause there.

14:03

I just threw a lot out, Cassie.

14:05

You were very involved in the still are.

14:07

We're doing a lot with Hugo on the still.

14:09

What would you add?

14:10

What did I miss?

14:11

I would add that what we're trying to do at campfire as we build out this

14:16

maturity model

14:17

kind of ecosystem is bring the maturity model into other tangential pieces of

14:22

content that

14:22

we're creating like case studies, like how can we shape the narrative around

14:26

the maturity

14:27

model and all the content that we're creating for us, we'll go either would be

14:31

those supporting

14:32

pieces that develop the maturity model or like positioning the maturity model

14:36

as a part

14:37

of the swogo brand and narrative that we want to develop.

14:41

So I think it's something that you have to think about holistically and how it

14:46

runs

14:46

through different marketing campaigns and how they play together as well.

14:50

Agreed.

14:51

It's very well said.

14:52

And this is the slide you were alluding to maybe five, ten minutes ago, the

14:57

difference

14:57

between traditional content marketing and content growth.

15:00

And yeah, we'd love your thoughts on this, everyone, because by no means Cassie

15:04

and I

15:05

know this super, super well, we're learning out loud with you all around the

15:11

differences

15:12

here.

15:13

But yeah, why don't you unpack it first?

15:14

Yeah, definitely learning as we go.

15:18

So we did want to think like, how is this actually different from maybe what

15:21

some of

15:22

us were doing before?

15:23

So we put together this little table and maybe this traditional content

15:26

marketing says more

15:28

about how I marketed 10 years ago than how anyone else marketed it in which

15:33

case that's

15:33

on me.

15:34

But when I started out in content marketing, the traditional approaches that

15:39

certainly

15:39

I followed and other people I work with followed were a bit spray and pray.

15:44

We would create tons of SEO content, see what resonated and then try to create

15:48

different

15:48

iterations of that and kind of hope it kept resonating and then be sort of

15:52

confused why

15:52

it didn't.

15:55

I think if you fast forward to now from 15 years ago when I started out in this

15:59

, we have

15:59

more ways to create content than ever, we've got more tools, media formats, you

16:04

name it.

16:06

It does still feel like we're plagued by more low quality content than ever

16:11

before.

16:11

And I think that's a function of that spray and pray attitude among some people

16:16

still continuing

16:17

perhaps.

16:18

So content like growth tries to reject that spray and pray approach and be

16:24

higher on focus

16:25

and lower on volume.

16:27

So when you're doing content like growth, you create fewer individual content

16:32

products.

16:32

So for example, I used to do like 25 SEO pieces a month.

16:36

That's very different from doing one really like conceptualized original built

16:42

out maturity

16:43

model for a sector that doesn't have a maturity model, for example, that feels

16:47

very different.

16:48

And those big assets that you do create in content like growth are designed to

16:51

be activated

16:52

at specific stages of the buyer or the customer journey, if someone's already a

16:57

customer,

16:57

and then repurposed for those different channels.

17:00

And you're creating those in partnership with that audience, which I feel like

17:04

is a differentiator

17:04

we've called out already where I certainly didn't create my 25 SEO pieces a

17:09

month in

17:10

partnership with the people I thought were going to be Googling and finding

17:15

them.

17:15

Yes.

17:16

No, no, I'm actually so I'm actually taping something up right now.

17:20

So let me see, hold on, let me watch this.

17:22

Like I said, I can be pretty dangerous with multitasking during a webinar.

17:28

So I'm actually going to pause this for a second and refresh this, go back into

17:36

slideshow.

17:37

I added one thing, leads versus signals and revenue.

17:44

So I think that's the other difference, right?

17:45

With traditional content marketing, we're going to focus on generating leads.

17:48

And I think with content-led growth, I know it's about revenue like we talked

17:53

about, but

17:53

it's about using signals to get to revenue through content engagement.

17:57

Can you give us an example of signals?

18:03

Well, it'll be a signal thing.

18:06

Absolutely, absolutely.

18:06

So we knew a drift.

18:08

We'll talk about this very soon.

18:11

It's coming up in the next couple of slides that after looking at the data for

18:14

about three

18:15

months that the MQL is dead, a very big cornerstone, strategic asset for Drift,

18:20

that the propensity

18:21

of that engagement with that content to turn into pipeline was higher than any

18:25

other piece

18:25

of content.

18:27

So we pointed then our sales team at that piece of content in a much more

18:32

deliberate

18:32

way.

18:33

And when someone downloaded that piece of content, not just read it on the

18:39

website because

18:40

it was ungated, but when they actually downloaded that piece of content, we did

18:44

a much more

18:44

deliberate outreach comparative to other content because normally engagement

18:49

with content,

18:49

unless there's a lot of engagement with content clustered within a short amount

18:54

of time from

18:55

a really ideal account, you're not going to do a ton of reach out because it's

18:59

still

18:59

low intent-ish.

19:01

But if you couple that engagement from the MQL is dead, plus they went to the--

19:05

or they

19:05

watched or went to a live webinar about that topic, then their engagement and

19:09

intent score

19:10

went up and you're getting to pipeline faster because you're seeing that signal

19:14

of intent

19:15

from the buyer as a trusted signal of they are probably either right in market

19:22

or right

19:22

about to be in market for something like Rift.

19:25

Love that.

19:26

Thank you so much.

19:28

That's really helpful.

19:29

Yeah, of course.

19:31

Thank you for asking that.

19:33

Let's move on to the next slide and talk about, yeah, how this is a full funnel

19:39

journey

19:39

a bit because, yeah, the MQL is dead.

19:42

It was also just going back to that example, Cassie, was something that our

19:45

customers loved

19:46

as well because it was very educational, helping people understand how to use

19:50

conversational

19:51

marketing both from a theoretical standpoint, but how to actually change the

19:56

website experience

19:57

using conversational marketing.

19:59

Yeah.

20:00

That's a good lead into this slide where we're thinking about, yes, content

20:03

like growth

20:04

is focused on pipeline and revenue and driving those almost lagging indicators,

20:09

connecting

20:10

those lagging indicators up to the assets.

20:12

But we're also still looking at those leading indicators as signals, as Mark

20:17

said.

20:17

So we'll be expecting a good impactful content like growth asset to be driving

20:25

those leading

20:26

indicators for things like brand visibility, conversations, yes website traffic

20:31

, the traditional

20:32

brand, community followers, fans, things like that, pipeline and revenue,

20:37

either new or

20:38

retained.

20:39

I think that retained is interesting because we're talking about the content

20:42

going through

20:43

the whole funnel rather than abandoning people when they are closed as a deal.

20:48

Oh, which I think is something that certainly I neglected to be bit in the

20:52

first part of

20:52

my career.

20:53

So it's true that a lot of us were focused on growing web traffic and MQLs,

21:00

sometimes

21:01

at the expense of other types of growth.

21:04

I don't suppose I'm surprising anyone when I say that in 2024, the SEO growth

21:09

playbook

21:09

is quite hard to win at.

21:10

A lot of verticals are pretty saturated.

21:14

And content like growth is about driving those results that the business

21:17

actually cares

21:17

about, the conversations, pipeline and revenue.

21:22

And also helps, I think, align sales and marketing more closely.

21:25

I think that's something we see in the swivel example because it helps sales

21:29

hit their pipeline

21:30

goals and support some of those lower funnel assets that have been validated by

21:34

talking

21:35

to real customers and haven't just been like, sort of, magicked up in the mind

21:38

of a content

21:39

marketer who's very embedded and perhaps not in tune with the ICP.

21:44

So I think that is an interesting outcome as well that aligning the sales and

21:47

marketing

21:47

teams.

21:49

So how do you do it?

21:51

But Becca makes a great comment in the chat, Cassie.

21:53

Love the MQL, a dead example and mindset.

21:58

The other factor is the traditional content marketing overlooks is getting a M

22:03

QL, or how

22:04

an MQL excuse me doesn't equate to a sale.

22:07

How many times have you downloaded a report, register for an event, et cetera,

22:10

only to

22:10

unsubscribe from the email in the future because the companies create the

22:14

content.

22:15

A more targeted, thoughtful approach that is audience led in building a

22:17

community around

22:18

an idea is key.

22:19

Yeah, like, yeah, you don't want to just, that's a great call, Becca.

22:23

You don't want to just, you know, have somebody download something after they

22:27

fill out a form

22:28

and then blast them with stuff, right?

22:30

Like it's so company first, we're going to nurture you, we're going to convert

22:33

you.

22:33

It's a linear journey.

22:35

None of that is the case anymore and it really never was the case.

22:39

But because buyers have, I would say, I would argue almost, almost if not all

22:44

the power

22:46

to buy something today, you have to match how you go to market to how people

22:50

buy and

22:51

a content led growth approach can be, can be that, right?

22:55

It could be something that's very people first, which gets into this next slide

23:01

And Cassie, I love these principles you've developed.

23:04

The five principles to taking your content and matching it to how people want

23:08

to consume

23:09

it today and how they, you know, expect to buy something today to your point,

23:12

Becca.

23:13

So yeah, why don't you unpack this now for everyone?

23:15

Yeah.

23:16

So I won't go through them too much because on the next five slides, we're

23:20

going to dig

23:21

into each one of these principles.

23:23

But I really try to distill some of the first principles, some of the ways of

23:29

thinking that

23:30

allow content like growth to be successful and make it possible to create.

23:35

And some of them are kind of added mindset changes, particularly number five, I

23:38

think

23:39

maybe some mindset change.

23:40

Some of them are operational and some of them are maybe more marketing or maybe

23:44

just

23:44

more communications first principles.

23:48

So there's a mix in there, but we can dive into them one by one.

23:51

Well, let's do it.

23:53

Build in public.

23:54

One of the, what's cliche thing to say now?

23:56

It was a building a bottle of building a product, but like it is true.

24:00

And you've dated it back this up.

24:03

Yeah, it is true.

24:05

So you can see some of the data on the screen.

24:07

I'll explain.

24:09

Campfire Labs just launched a new LinkedIn distribution service.

24:13

We didn't have expertise in LinkedIn before.

24:16

I think we do now and we've been developing that over the last six months.

24:20

I think if I were taking a traditional content marketing approach, what I might

24:24

have done

24:25

in the past, I might have researched LinkedIn distribution, tested in secret,

24:30

some LinkedIn

24:31

distribution things, done like a pilot with perhaps one customer and then done

24:36

a big launch

24:36

announcement right at the end.

24:38

And it would have been a surprise to everyone that we've been working on

24:42

LinkedIn distribution.

24:42

We kind of flipped that and we wanted to build in public.

24:45

So what we've been doing over the last four months is building our LinkedIn

24:50

distribution

24:51

service in public on LinkedIn.

24:53

It's a bit meta and a bit confusing.

24:56

So that means we've been posting on LinkedIn about building a LinkedIn service.

25:02

It's been really interesting.

25:03

The screenshot you can see on the slide is a bump we had in unattributable

25:09

traffic that's

25:10

correlated to what a viral LinkedIn post that we did.

25:14

So we did this viral LinkedIn post.

25:16

We got like 50,000 impressions on LinkedIn.

25:19

We had an unusual spike in website traffic or the day that same day and the day

25:25

after

25:25

from dark social.

25:26

So we're correlating it to LinkedIn post.

25:28

And then we posted that on LinkedIn talking about how that had happened and how

25:31

LinkedIn

25:32

distribution can be impactful for bringing people to your site or bringing

25:35

people to

25:36

your service.

25:37

And all of that is us building in public, talking about us building a service,

25:42

not being

25:43

embarrassed that we're learning in public, but rather treating that as an asset

25:48

It's been really beneficial for us.

25:50

We've grown our LinkedIn following from 2,500 to 5,000 followers, my LinkedIn

25:54

following

25:55

because we've posted online.

25:57

We've run loads of micro experiments and tests to get feedback from our ICP on

26:03

the LinkedIn

26:03

distribution service and see how people react to it.

26:07

We've tested the whole service and operationalized it on ourselves so that we

26:11

're ready for customers

26:12

who come in.

26:14

And I didn't put this on here, but it's actually driven five pipeline leads for

26:19

us, five direct

26:20

leads over the last month as well, which has been really great.

26:24

It's been super.

26:25

And we like we just launched the service, but we've been building it for months

26:29

It's an incredible example.

26:31

Baccala loves it as well, especially the younger generations who are looking

26:33

for this

26:34

transparency could not agree more.

26:36

Two things before we go on to the next principle.

26:38

One is this idea of minimal viable audience.

26:40

I'm a very big believer in this.

26:43

We need some stuff in club, PF, around building a minimal viable audience.

26:48

The other idea around this is like minimal viable product.

26:50

I would argue you build your minimal viable product, which you're doing through

26:54

building

26:55

a minimal viable audience.

26:56

So as the product gets into a point where it's like sellable, where you start

27:00

to get

27:00

design partners or whatever that might be, you have some audience behind it.

27:04

Great example.

27:05

And then the second point, and I love everyone, everyone who's listening today

27:08

to chime in

27:08

on this, if you're listening to the recording, you know, talk about it on

27:12

LinkedIn or put

27:13

it in the Slack community.

27:14

If you're an insider member, is this idea of LinkedIn posts are the new blog

27:19

articles,

27:20

meaning you don't write a blog article first, write a LinkedIn post or a

27:24

collection of LinkedIn

27:25

posts and then turn those into blog articles for your blog on your hosted

27:30

domain.

27:31

Love people's reactions to that.

27:34

You can give those reactions at any time, we'll move on.

27:39

But Cassie, do you subscribe to that?

27:41

Do you think, I don't know, I push back to that, Mark?

27:44

Oh, no, I subscribed to it completely because you've already got a baked

27:49

audience on LinkedIn,

27:51

whereas you don't, usually when you're blogging and just putting it on your

27:55

site.

27:56

So I think you go to where your audience is rather than trying to biggle them

28:00

to come

28:00

to you.

28:02

One thing I want to make clear in this example, yes, we were building a service

28:06

in public,

28:07

but the idea is that you can build a content asset in public.

28:11

So for example, with the Swoogho and maturity model, we were talking about

28:15

building that

28:16

in public as well.

28:18

So you would go out and say, hey, we're thinking of creating an asset that's

28:21

like this and

28:22

here's the main ideas, like do a poll, get some feedback, talk about the people

28:26

you're

28:26

interviewing to get information for the asset and just start building

28:29

excitement about it.

28:30

So it's not just services and products.

28:32

You can do this with, we're advocating for doing this for each of those core

28:36

content

28:37

and growth assets you're creating.

28:39

Love that.

28:40

And I know people that are doing this in a undeliberate way.

28:44

I think there needs to be a service, a company that literally does this and it

28:49

's like wide

28:49

weight, your blogger to cool about like evergreen long term distribution

28:53

advantage.

28:54

You can get both now.

28:55

If you do LinkedIn posts and blog, LinkedIn posts are going to get a ton of

28:57

views and

28:57

engagement like you're proving here, but then over the long term, LinkedIn

29:00

doesn't help

29:01

you.

29:02

The blog helps you though, right?

29:04

So it's like LinkedIn first, blog second, you get the benefit of both.

29:07

Anyway, we move on.

29:08

That's again, I think another example of like a more content led growth type of

29:12

mindset,

29:12

type of approach.

29:14

Treating content as a product, Cassie.

29:17

We're doing this at gocatalyst.com.

29:19

All right, Brian, I love it.

29:21

I thank you for sharing the example.

29:22

We got to check that out, gocatalyst.com.

29:26

Treating content as a product.

29:27

Talk to the MQL is dead.

29:28

I mean, we called it DriftPress, but we had a, we had the Drift Network for the

29:33

podcast,

29:34

DriftPress for the books.

29:35

We printed a lot of books.

29:37

This won't scale as an example of a book we printed.

29:39

The MQL is dead.

29:41

We also created mini versions that were physical books.

29:43

We're going to do the same thing with TAC.

29:46

We actually have a book in club PF right now that's called the People First

29:49

Advantage.

29:50

We're going to physically print that book probably in time for inbound.

29:55

But I think what you have here on the left, Cassie, when you think about

29:58

content as a

29:59

product, the positioning, the messaging, the value, going back to the idea of

30:04

outcomes,

30:05

what's the outcome your content is helping someone get to is super important,

30:09

right?

30:10

So if you're not thinking of your, of your strategic content assets as a

30:14

product today,

30:15

that's one of the first things you can do.

30:17

And literally created as a brief, every content asset should have a brief.

30:21

Who's it being written for?

30:22

Why?

30:23

What's the value?

30:24

What's positioning and messaging?

30:26

How is it different than what's already out in the market from a content

30:29

standpoint?

30:29

And then yes, do the things that you talk about on the slide, turn that into

30:34

other smaller,

30:36

almost like freemium content assets, right?

30:39

Like a clip is almost like a thing that gets someone to then recognize, "Ooh,

30:42

this thing's

30:42

really interesting."

30:43

Like I never knew that they had the MQL is dead and I watched a clip about the

30:49

MQL is

30:49

dead in a webinar.

30:50

That's going to get me then to go download or read more about it on the website

30:55

It's almost like, you know, you have a free trial or a freemium part of your

30:57

product,

30:58

kind of like product length growth and you're driving people into the bigger

31:01

product experience.

31:03

Anyway, there's a lot to unpack here at Cassie.

31:05

What would you add?

31:10

One of the things I really like is the idea of launching the content asset as

31:14

you would

31:15

launch a product through events, through different breakouts, through webinars,

31:21

things like that.

31:22

So not sort of just focusing on distributing it through social channels or

31:27

things like

31:27

that.

31:28

You want to make a big noise about it as you would if you had a product feature

31:32

launch

31:32

or even a product launch.

31:33

So I think that's a big difference as well and sort of sometimes difficult to

31:37

get your

31:37

head around about how might you launch a piece of content.

31:40

I think that's an interesting challenge.

31:42

Yeah, but I love that.

31:43

And before we move on to go back to Nicole's comment about, yeah, the LinkedIn

31:48

blog post,

31:49

LinkedIn post blog post, you're building up a profile of a company executive

31:53

maybe.

31:53

Yeah, absolutely.

31:54

It's actually probably one of the easiest ways to sell the idea of LinkedIn,

31:57

for example,

31:58

to a company executive because you can say, look, we want to build out your

32:02

profile or

32:02

use your profile.

32:03

We want to create zero-click content and engagement from this, but then we're

32:07

going to get more

32:09

good, real, attributable marketing ROI from all this effort because we're going

32:16

to put

32:17

it on our website and we're going to be able to see traffic conversions, all

32:20

that other

32:21

stuff from it as well.

32:23

And we'll be able to use both either the LinkedIn post or the blog article in

32:27

sequences in other

32:28

ways that can help again nurture, nurture awareness into some type of like

32:35

maybe demand

32:35

capture motion.

32:36

But I think, yeah, the way you can do this is going to help you maybe pitch the

32:42

idea of

32:42

getting someone involved in LinkedIn as well.

32:47

So this one, number three, this is uncommon.

32:51

I see it more.

32:52

So when I was joining Drift back in late 2018, early 2019, talking to David K

32:57

ansell, the

32:58

CEO, he and I were very deliberate in how are we going to design the marketing

33:05

team.

33:06

This was even actually before they had a full on CMO.

33:11

And we were like, wait a minute, we should think about how to design content so

33:17

that

33:17

it's being used in the most strategic way across the entire company to maximize

33:22

all

33:23

of the ROI behind it.

33:25

So at Drift, we took five different teams and put them underneath what we call

33:29

content

33:29

and community.

33:30

So there was a content team, traditional content marketers, if you will, there

33:35

was an

33:35

events team that did all of the events, including in person online and also

33:40

like Drift hosted,

33:42

but Drift company events just for employees.

33:44

So we centralized all events.

33:46

We built a community team, which was like social and then our own community and

33:50

membership

33:51

experience, which was called Drift Insider.

33:54

We had the creative team underneath this and then an education team, which was

33:57

people

33:58

creating courses and more very much focused on outcome based education to help

34:05

someone

34:05

either a customer or also a non-customer understand how to use Drift and

34:09

conversational

34:09

marketing sales together to get to these outcomes.

34:13

So what did this do?

34:15

This allowed us to create a lot more content more effectively, be able to keep

34:21

the design,

34:22

the consistency, the messaging, everything, much more organized, much more

34:26

streamlined.

34:27

We created this one plus one equals three effect with our events and content.

34:33

We allowed actually a lot more creative ideas to come to light because we

34:37

designed content

34:39

basically as a service for the rest of the go to market teams.

34:43

So Cassie, you talked about like integrated revenue campaigns and thinking

34:46

about how to

34:46

like make this a thematic thing that's campaign based.

34:49

Well, we said, hey, you know, you're going after this new ICP or we need more

34:53

pipeline

34:54

from this ICP, let's work together with those sales teams and the people on the

34:58

demand

34:59

inside of the marketing team to figure out how to design the best content

35:03

assets either

35:03

from existing content or create a new cornerstone asset that's going to be used

35:08

in these places

35:09

to either create mature, accelerate pipeline or better retain our customers to

35:13

get them

35:14

to upsell into a new product.

35:16

So this structure is definitely, I think, very uncommon.

35:19

Number one, I'd like to see more teams move to this structure.

35:24

But it requires someone to then have the, I'd say the fortitude, to some degree

35:34

, fortitude

35:35

to lead this because, you know, it's multi-disciplinary, right?

35:41

You have to have a little expertise in content, in events, in community and

35:46

creative.

35:47

But that's where, you know, you need to find someone who's just really strong

35:49

in each

35:50

of these disciplines and if you as the leader of this team who probably, you

35:54

know, isn't

35:55

going to know everything about all these things but can understand how to

35:58

organize it together,

35:59

especially from a demand revenue marketing lens, you'll see a lot of success.

36:05

I'll pause there to see if there's any questions or thoughts about this.

36:08

But I do think this is the best way to design a content-led growth motion and

36:13

then you would

36:14

have a revenue marketing team be in close partnership with this team.

36:18

Amak, do you, like, who should be leading this team?

36:21

Is it the CMO?

36:22

Is that the person who's responsible for this?

36:25

I don't think it's the CMO.

36:26

I think you could have a title of like, you know, VP of content, community VP

36:30

of brand

36:30

and content VP.

36:31

It's probably a VP level person.

36:35

I'd say that VP, SVP, EVP, depending on the size of the organization.

36:38

It's someone who knows how to use content in community to generate revenue but

36:43

isn't going

36:44

to be the person who has to figure out all the ways to activate this through

36:49

channels.

36:50

So like, this team doesn't really own many channels at all.

36:53

They might have an owned channel from a community membership standpoint but

36:58

they're going to

37:01

be the service, if you will, the internal agency almost to make sure that the

37:06

sales team,

37:07

the CS team and the marketing team has what it needs in order to create

37:12

different offers,

37:14

mostly in the form of content and events and use those things to create signals

37:19

of engagement

37:20

so that those signals can be turned into revenue.

37:24

Ben, I actually, I think I do have my original job description that I wrote for

37:30

David at

37:31

Drift because he basically told me like, you need to write your job description

37:33

just so

37:34

we can get this approved.

37:35

I will try to find that if you want to email me, markattackgtm.com or just a

37:39

link didn't

37:40

mean to remind me about that but yeah, I think I do a job description.

37:43

I don't, Cassie, do you have any thoughts on this?

37:46

It's a little out there.

37:48

I'd say that much.

37:49

No, I don't think it's out there.

37:52

I think it's really great.

37:53

I'm really innovative.

37:55

I wonder about how easy it is to then connect that person up with the revenue

38:00

teams like

38:00

VP of content but with a revenue background, with an understanding of how you

38:05

're driving

38:06

that revenue, I think that's interesting.

38:09

One of the things I've been thinking about recently is does content and product

38:14

, how

38:14

do they fit together?

38:16

Does all of this fit under product?

38:18

Does it fit under marketing?

38:20

That's a different conversation of this webinar but that was the root of my

38:23

question here.

38:25

Yeah.

38:26

No, it's a good point.

38:27

I always say the best content marketers are fantastic product marketers as well

38:33

So true, right?

38:34

Because the best content and product marketers are super close and become

38:40

partners with customers

38:43

and they build content with customers, not for customers.

38:47

So yeah, it kind of goes back to what we talked on the beginning.

38:50

Definitely.

38:52

Another one.

38:53

We have two more principles to get through and then Cassie's going to walk you

38:56

through

38:57

the eight steps.

39:00

Let's see, Lena, can we do content on growth approach with the traditional

39:03

marketing team?

39:04

We're going to start in case.

39:05

Yeah, yeah, yeah, we'll get to that.

39:06

Yeah, it actually is.

39:07

In two slides, we'll talk about this.

39:09

I think you can, right, Cassie?

39:11

Yeah, yeah, definitely you can.

39:13

So one thing that I was lucky enough to witness at HubSpot that we took to

39:19

Drift, we kind of

39:20

took it at Air Meat, just ran out of time, but then we definitely are doing

39:25

attack, is

39:25

this idea of find the problem and then name it and then name, of course, the

39:33

better version

39:34

like the solution, right?

39:35

The hero, whatever you want to call it, to solving that problem.

39:39

But I think this is a really important aspect of content-led growth.

39:42

Content marketing, maybe people do this as part of their content marketing or

39:45

in-bound

39:45

marketing efforts, it never was something that I taught or was really doing it

39:51

in a super

39:52

strategic way outside of what HubSpot taught me.

39:55

But I believe this is so important.

39:57

And even Srugo, we could talk about that example as well, HubSpot, the problem,

40:03

a lot

40:03

of people think HubSpot, like the problem is outbound.

40:06

The real problem about outbound, though, outbound marketing was being

40:09

interrupted.

40:10

Ironically, that problem is still not exactly solved and inbound marketing is

40:14

evolving.

40:15

But the problem was being interrupted, interruption.

40:18

Drift, a lot of people think the problem is forms.

40:22

The actual problem, though, and this problem, by the way, is fundamental to how

40:25

you go to

40:26

market because when you think about HubSpot's product, the product was all

40:30

about building

40:31

things, features, now hubs, et cetera, to solve this interruption-based problem

40:38

Drift, the whole product was about how do we reduce friction in the buying

40:41

experience,

40:42

both from a marketing standpoint and a sales standpoint.

40:46

The thing that we named as the enemy, the real problem was forms because that

40:50

was the

40:50

thing that a lot of people obviously knew and understood.

40:55

And outbound marketing, people knew and understood and have played well against

40:58

inbound marketing.

40:59

With TAC, the problem we finally have identified is generic.

41:03

Your go-to-market is generic.

41:06

It's not very interesting.

41:08

What we named it as is its company first.

41:11

Your go-to-market is generic because you take a very company-centric company

41:16

first approach

41:17

to bringing your product into the market, which is a lot of these older school

41:22

tactics

41:22

that don't really work as well because they don't match to how people buy today

41:26

So I say all that because I do think, Cassie, that when you think about your

41:30

content program

41:31

and you think about how to use content-led growth as a strategic revenue driver

41:35

, you have

41:36

to find this point of view.

41:37

You've got to stand for something, you've got to find the red thread in what

41:41

you're doing

41:43

to really create a powerful enough content strategy that can then be product

41:49

ized.

41:50

I think you can do it without this to some degree, but I do think this is like

41:56

almost

41:56

a requirement, maybe not a full requirement, but I think it's very close to a

41:59

requirement

42:00

to getting it done well.

42:02

Agreed.

42:03

Agreed.

42:04

And this kind of goes back to treating your content as a product because I feel

42:07

like this

42:07

is very lean UX-focused in being identified and identifying that problem that

42:12

you're trying

42:13

to solve for the customer.

42:15

And what we do is go a little bit further with the content growth and name your

42:20

enemy,

42:20

name the thing you're going up against and then build your content strategy

42:24

around that.

42:25

I definitely don't have this nail, this first principle nailed down yet.

42:28

I haven't practiced this one enough myself.

42:30

Looking forward to getting better at this.

42:32

Well, this is a great example of product marketing.

42:36

This is why I say content marketers are great product marketers because really

42:39

what this

42:40

is is really, really good product.

42:42

I would almost argue it's brand marketing.

42:45

It's brand through product, right?

42:47

You built the product to help solve the interruption problem.

42:50

And there's a red thread that can be talked about, right?

42:55

If you look at like tax stuff now, right?

42:57

We talk about generic go to market, we talk about company first, we talk about

43:00

people

43:00

first.

43:01

You're basically, how do you create something that allows you to beat the drum

43:05

so that when

43:05

someone sees a one time, sees a five times, sees a ten times, they just know,

43:10

yes, this

43:11

brand is associated to this problem or enemy and they created this new approach

43:17

to solving

43:18

it.

43:19

All right, on.

43:22

And lastly, I love this image.

43:24

This came out, I think this came out like when I was like first joining Drift,

43:27

actually

43:27

might say on the image, yeah, 2018.

43:29

This is an old image, but it's a good one.

43:31

Yeah, it's a good one.

43:33

I had not seen it before, but if anyone subscribes to Tracy Wallace, her from

43:38

Clavio, her newsletter

43:39

is really great and she shared this last week.

43:41

And I was just like, oh, you know, really sort of makes your eyes hurt.

43:47

And I added this because one thing that Mark and I found doing this content

43:50

like growth

43:51

is that attribution is definitely not easy.

43:55

I don't know, content attribution has never been easy.

43:57

You know, it's one of those like only grail problems.

44:01

Being able to attribute revenue or anything else to your content is the holy

44:04

grail for

44:05

content people.

44:07

I feel looking at this image and just like having been in content so long and

44:11

doing content

44:11

like growth now, I'm a bit skeptical about how realistic it is, especially for

44:16

content

44:17

like growth, I think.

44:18

Firstly, because when we track attribution, we're only focused on the assets we

44:23

think convert.

44:24

We're tracking attribution impacts for specific assets, but there's hundreds of

44:28

other touch

44:29

points that move a buyer along the journey that we may or may not know about.

44:35

And so how are we attributing to them and how is that contributing to the other

44:40

attribution?

44:43

And second, the journeys are so complicated.

44:47

We used to thinking in this tofu mofu bofu kind of shorthand when we ideate or

44:51

things

44:52

like that, but like, how does that fit into here?

44:55

What's the relevance of tofu mofu bofu?

44:57

When you look at this kind of craziness in this image, I think how do you

45:02

attribute revenue

45:04

to a content asset in the middle of all of this?

45:06

It's not as easy as moving people down the funnel and giving a percentage more

45:10

attribution

45:11

to them as they move down or your content assets move down.

45:16

And thirdly, how clean is your attribution data anyway?

45:21

I as a content marketer have never had very good content attribution data.

45:26

I really tried, but it's always been like a proxy or an approximation for

45:33

another thing.

45:35

I think that's pretty standard across a lot of content marketers where your

45:38

attribution

45:38

data is kind of not perfect and not very clean.

45:46

And content like growth focuses on bringing people in and building those

45:50

relationships

45:50

over the time.

45:51

I think that kind of jives fundamentally with the complexity that we see here.

45:57

And with the human aspect of real buyer journeys, how we really buy products

46:03

and how we really

46:03

interact with content on that journey doesn't lend itself to easy attribution.

46:07

And I feel like we just kind of have to relax into that and still be looking to

46:11

attribute,

46:12

but accept that it's not a one and done process.

46:16

It's why I like signals.

46:17

There you go.

46:19

Yeah.

46:20

All of these things on this slide, it could be a signal.

46:23

And some of them, you won't be able to ever capture probably because there's

46:26

just no way

46:27

right now to capture that signal because it's so internal into the buying team.

46:31

But you think of content as signals versus conversions.

46:38

Signals are part conversion, part engagement, part other things.

46:42

But I do think that's a better way to think about content attribution.

46:45

For sure.

46:46

Like if you could tell me, we actually did this at HubSpot at one point.

46:53

Someone, if someone engages with five or more pieces of content, right, there's

47:00

five

47:01

or more content signals.

47:03

Once that threshold is met, the chance that person buys goes up by X percent.

47:10

Those are the types of data points I'd be on the hunt for if I was at a company

47:16

Yeah.

47:17

Tac is just not there.

47:19

We don't have that type of following.

47:20

But if I was at a software company or any company at the end of the day selling

47:26

something,

47:26

trying to find that moment where it says, yeah, there's just a very strong

47:32

correlation.

47:32

I mean, even like causation because it says you as a person consuming this

47:38

content from

47:39

the brand, if you will, once you engage with that much, the chance that you

47:45

will eventually

47:46

buy, and it might not be like immediately, but like the chance you eventually

47:49

buy goes

47:49

up by this much, then you know you should be paying and doing a lot more with

47:54

those

47:54

people that meet that threshold.

47:57

Mark, Nicole has asked a really interesting question.

48:02

How can we reconcile this attribution challenge with the need to prove the

48:05

impact of content

48:05

marketing to leadership?

48:07

Anecole.

48:07

This is where I do think content marketers need to become part of like the

48:14

integrated

48:15

like revenue campaigns.

48:16

It's sometimes called integrated marketing campaigns, but like your content

48:19

needs to

48:20

be part of like the actual campaign execution so that it shows that, hey, this

48:25

piece of

48:26

content number one has influenced this much pipeline of revenue and or has

48:31

sourced this

48:32

much pipeline of revenue.

48:34

So there's always have to be some sort of attribution for sure for content.

48:38

And I've always done both.

48:39

I've said here's influenced, here sourced, and then here are the content

48:43

signals that

48:44

are the ways that marketing can can tell when something should be promoted more

48:51

or used

48:51

more or or maybe you know, repackaged more.

48:56

But then here are the signals that the sales team can use to better help them

49:01

with warm

49:02

outbound or to supplement their cold outbound with this content.

49:07

So it's just using content more holistically across all these channels and all

49:11

these teams

49:12

as part of this integrated campaign approach.

49:15

Interesting.

49:17

We should we could do a whole webinar on that on that just integrated campaigns

49:22

We actually do a lot of good content in club PF about integrated campaigns,

49:25

especially

49:26

if you're an insider member.

49:27

But yes, let's we were perfectly on time.

49:30

We got five minutes left or so.

49:31

So let's let's round it out with this.

49:33

And then one last thing about measuring.

49:35

Yeah.

49:36

Well, thanks Mark.

49:37

So we wanted to give you a way that you can get started creating your first

49:42

content like

49:43

growth asset, regardless of the size or structure of your content team.

49:47

I think this is something everyone could try.

49:50

This is something we're currently doing for our own marketing at campfire labs

49:53

as well

49:53

and we'll be building in public about that.

49:55

So improving our process as well.

49:58

But I think start off with this ABM approach where you identify some companies

50:03

or accounts

50:04

or people that you'd like as a customer.

50:09

And you can reach out to them like cold outreach or if you have a relationship

50:12

or a network

50:12

or anything like that and asking us them to appear in a new piece of research

50:17

about their

50:18

industry.

50:19

So you're already bringing them in at that kind of like ideation and creation

50:24

stage.

50:24

The ask will be a 30 minute interview about an interest and an industry

50:28

challenge and

50:29

how they're thinking about it.

50:33

And this might sound familiar to Nicole because I'm currently working with

50:35

Nicole on a piece

50:36

about an industry challenge about content marketers, one person content teams.

50:40

So Nicole, now you've seen how the sausage is made.

50:45

Once you've asked for that 30 minute interview, make the same ask of a handful

50:49

of customers

50:49

so you're existing customers focusing on how they solved that industry

50:53

challenge.

50:54

So with the prospects, you're asking like how the industry challenge and how

50:59

they're thinking

51:00

about it with the customers, you're asking how they solved it so a slightly

51:03

different

51:03

angle.

51:04

And then with those interviews, you're creating a narrative content asset about

51:08

solving this

51:08

problem by doing X to achieve Y.

51:12

So you're including like examples, images, things like that.

51:16

We can talk through some of the examples that we've been working on or looking

51:20

at.

51:21

So the example we're working at the moment is solving the problem of being a

51:23

one person

51:24

content team by using content growth, content like growth to achieve like X

51:28

results, things

51:29

like that.

51:32

You then after you've done the narrative content asset, do a webinar featuring

51:35

one customer

51:36

and one prospect.

51:37

So bringing in some experts on how they're thinking on this topic and share

51:42

both those

51:43

content assets with the sales and customer success teams and product teams with

51:47

anyone

51:47

who can use it as a way to teach folks in the pipeline how to solve the same

51:51

challenge.

51:52

Like you want to be helpful to people in the pipeline with this asset as well

51:55

as people

51:56

you're marketing to.

51:57

And then think about repackaging and distributing this asset across different

52:02

channels in different

52:03

ways, but always with the same message and beating the drum like Mark says,

52:07

rather than

52:07

like thinking it's wrapped up then and saying, right, we need to create another

52:11

content asset,

52:12

keep like getting new things out of it, new events, new webinars, new, new

52:16

smaller assets

52:17

that you can recycle across those channels.

52:20

Great checklist.

52:22

I mean, it's just like it's spot on.

52:25

So we did a drift, that's what we did at Airmeats.

52:29

It's what we're doing a little bit today too.

52:30

And yeah, I mean, you follow this and then these three next, you know, ways to

52:36

measure

52:36

it, I think just kind of come into play.

52:39

So when, so I think number six is super interesting, right?

52:47

This goes back to Nicole's question.

52:49

It's like, oh, how do you know the impact?

52:51

Well, if we do a webinar, it's very measurable.

52:59

So you could say like, look, this asset is being used for all of these

53:04

different purposes.

53:05

And we can show how the actual asset drove engagement and then maybe influence

53:09

revenue,

53:09

but a webinar is usually more attributable to revenue.

53:13

So hey, let's do that, right?

53:15

So I, a content, a content piece shouldn't just be one thing anymore.

53:21

That's why this idea of cornerstone content and content like growth is so

53:25

important.

53:26

How you measure each of these three things will be hard to do if you just

53:31

create one

53:32

asset, I think, Cassie.

53:33

You need like multiple assets to really show the real value, the real ROI of

53:37

spending all

53:38

this time and energy, writing out the story, interviewing all the customers and

53:42

all that

53:43

stuff, right?

53:44

Like that's the, that's the, I think the unlock here.

53:47

Yeah, that's a really interesting point.

53:49

It would be hard to justify like 10 interviews for a one and done asset, wouldn

53:53

't it?

53:54

It's tough.

53:55

I mean, like that's, I mean, the MQL is dead.

53:56

I mean, I remember creating that and that was, you know, multi months, a lot of

54:00

work,

54:00

like, you know, multiple interviews with people, subject matter experts, all of

54:03

this stuff,

54:04

like aligning it to where the product's going.

54:06

Yeah.

54:07

And if we just did that thing, like, and did nothing else, you know, with it

54:11

for it,

54:11

I, it still would have probably been pretty successful, but it wouldn't had,

54:14

would not

54:15

have had the same ROI.

54:19

Um, yeah, I mean, the measurement though, like there's so much to unpack here,

54:24

probably

54:24

another webinar.

54:26

But again, there's a lot of resources you can check out in club PF.

54:30

We believe in this so much, just as the last plug, campfire and tack have

54:35

decided to do

54:35

a joint package.

54:37

We have two options.

54:39

We'll do audience research.

54:40

We'll do content execution.

54:42

So the build, the building, the creating of the content and channel activation.

54:47

I'm super excited to finally have this live this month, Cassie, for people to

54:51

use, but

54:51

like, it was a good example of us doing this.

54:54

Netradine, another company who sells a hardware and software solution.

54:59

Very interesting.

55:00

Netradine.com is another example of us doing this.

55:04

So check it out, check it out on a tax website, tackgta.com.

55:09

You can check out the package.

55:10

Um, and I know you're adding it to campfire website soon.

55:13

If it's not already there.

55:14

Yeah.

55:15

Just at one point on Netradine.

55:17

Please, please.

55:18

Just to give you an example of how you should be recycling these assets, the

55:23

cornerstone

55:23

asset, like the key asset that we're doing for Netradine.

55:27

They want to keep recycling it and keep using it for different, for different

55:31

mini assets

55:32

during six months.

55:33

So that's how long you should be looking to like really get your money's worth

55:37

from this

55:38

one big piece of content that you invested.

55:40

I'm so glad you said that six months is the minimum for most.

55:44

I would argue it gets down to almost 12 months because then it starts to get

55:47

into like,

55:47

well, how do you reposition it, repackage it?

55:50

Um, almost, you know, redo it at some point.

55:54

Like MQL is dead.

55:55

I think with two or three versions, iterations to keep it fresh.

55:58

So like, yeah, that's the other thing.

56:01

People think like, Oh, I create content.

56:02

That's it.

56:03

I'm never going to update it or do it like no, like hubspop, the state of in

56:06

bound marketing

56:06

report, which ran for like, I don't even know eight or 10 years.

56:09

We just did it every year.

56:10

It's an ultimate report.

56:11

It got a ton of a ton of engagement, ton of pipeline.

56:15

Yeah, don't think a piece of content is just you do it once and that's it.

56:20

Um, club F, many of you and members, if you'd love to join us and become an

56:25

insider, you

56:26

get a lot more benefits.

56:27

Um, check it out clubpeoplefirst.com.

56:29

But again, free members, you get access to a monthly webinar, all that good

56:32

stuff.

56:33

If there are any other questions, we've time for probably one more.

56:36

Happy to take it right now.

56:38

Loved the engagement during the webinar.

56:40

Thank you everyone for coming live.

56:41

If you're listening to the recording, we hope you enjoyed it.

56:43

Cassie, thank you to you.

56:45

Big thank you.

56:46

Thank you so much, Mark.

56:47

This was really fun.

56:48

A lot of fun.

56:49

Yeah, let us know folks.

56:50

If you have any other questions, we're happy to answer.

56:53

Um, but that was, that was content that growth in 60 minutes or so.

57:00

More to come.

57:01

If you, if you believe in it, let us know on LinkedIn.

57:03

Happy to connect with you all.

57:04

It looks like we're done with the, uh, the questions.

57:07

Again, thanks everyone.

57:09

Thank you, Sydney, Becca, Nicole, Carrie.

57:11

Have a great rest of your day.

57:12

Cassie, we'll talk to you later.

57:13

Yeah, thanks everyone.

57:14

Bye bye.

57:15

Bye. Bye!

57:16

You

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