Mark Kilens 53 min

The Best and Worst Ways to Design Your Event Strategy


Discover expert insights from Julius Solaris on the best and worst ways to design your event strategy. Maximize success and avoid pitfalls with these tips!



0:00

All right. Hey, everyone. Welcome to a club P F and I guess, you know, non club

0:07

P F monthly event. These are events that I personally look forward to every

0:12

month learning from experts that are in the field.

0:15

And Mark and I come from an event background. So when Julius agreed to do this,

0:19

it was someone that you know Mark and I we've known for a while and I'll let

0:24

him kind of give his own introduction but you know we've been in similar types

0:29

of companies throughout the our careers and

0:33

we both you know I look to Julius for a lot of information when it comes to

0:38

events and he's been nothing but supportive to me as well as Mark so Julius

0:43

yeah I'll let you introduce yourself and one more thing I wanted to tackle

0:48

before we get into that.

0:49

And I think I'm going to make this conversational again you know Julius is is

0:52

able to answer questions. If you have questions drop them in the chat will

0:56

tackle them throughout the the entire presentation.

1:00

But Julius the floor is yours. Yeah, thank you so much for having me and also

1:05

like my personal welcome to the ball push plus subscribers since this is going

1:10

to be recorded also for my audience.

1:13

So we're going to go push we are you know media and consulting company for the

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events industry so very vertical on events.

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And we do everything from go to market to content strategy for event companies

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agencies large fortune 500 events that kind of need help with their marketing

1:34

registration whatever it's going on.

1:38

And I've been in media for almost 20 years now for the events industry have

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done a ton of research and analysis around a website called event and be where

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we used to do.

1:48

I was I'm an OG creator as a blogger 2007 I sold that business in 2019 to skift

1:55

, which by the way is having their skift forum right now in New York is a large

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travel media company.

2:02

So I moved to the dark side as they say I started working client side on swap

2:06

card as head of engagement later as VP of marketing for hop in so I've seen a

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lot in my life.

2:13

I can say, but obviously being following you guys for a long time I'm such a

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privilege to be with you.

2:21

Mark I feel you've initiated, you know the event led sort of concept when

2:26

obviously as CMO and air meat, you know, I sort of I think you're single handed

2:32

ly responsible for this.

2:35

Oh, so thank you so much for putting sort of together. So for starting I would

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say what is was the mixing of events and marketing, which is to be honest

2:46

extending the capability life cycle business model of events per se, which is

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always they always they always been niched into, you know, the hospitality industry

3:03

evolution. But right now you give it a new life I feel by connecting the dots

3:05

and like you know this convert convergence of Martek and event tech is coming

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together just talked about it

3:08

on LinkedIn this morning our investors are super excited about that our event

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companies are pivoting and transitioning to become more sophisticated on the

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marketing side and our marketing companies are marketing tech companies are

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looking at event tech companies to complement.

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So almost like what happened with social media in 2010 when you have HubSpot

3:27

buying, you know, integrating social media capabilities we're seeing that in

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events right now so this is further confirmation of what you started Mark and

3:35

thanks so much for having me here.

3:37

I appreciate the kind of words Julius no and to me like this conversation is

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two things.

3:42

Events to your point have always been about like the art side of the brain

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right like the the I was good this confused I think that's more like the the

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left side of the brain or is the right side which was the more like don't ask

3:54

me I'm confused online with life since I probably

3:57

the left I would say. And then and then like what we've tried to do and now

4:03

with anyone kind of getting on board this idea of event growth.

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It's like bringing in the data side because an event always been about the

4:09

people the connection the experience no one probably knows that better than you

4:13

even in space for so long.

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And wait a minute, now technology there's so much amazing data that you can use

4:20

for both a business standpoint but also an attendee you know customer point of

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view standpoint.

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And it was it was just kind of being missed for some reason so I'm excited to

4:33

talk about both things today and events to me are one of the most important

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ways to get people to truly remember something like remember.

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And then to actually go from remembering to understanding to mastering

4:48

something.

4:50

Events are so important because events are about fundamentally to me Julie's

4:54

and like what do you think conversations isn't that isn't that the essence of a

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really good event like conversation and connection.

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I mean it is it is, you know, and we leave we live in a in a moment where you

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know the online context is so much right we get to know each other online so

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much.

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But then again and again when we meet in person that type of connection is

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superior to any other type of connection in terms of the impact that it has so

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it's something that we perceived for received I would say for a long time.

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But now research is backing that up so data is backing that up so that's the

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interesting point right is like you know a gut feeling you know serendipity I

5:38

've never been quite sold on that concept of like serendipity and during the

5:43

pandemic how we miss serendipity during virtual events.

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Like you know that to me when you say serendipity is almost chance I don't

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believe in chance of like I believe in a business environment we have to make

5:53

business decisions and like be operational in terms of what we do I want to

5:57

show you something here other than

5:59

ball push whatever we did the pitch, but you know this is like interesting

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research that visible put out like just like last month so I invite you to

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check out that research, you know marketers like this has been consistent

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by the way, the problem is that it's been expensive right events are expensive

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they tend to be expensive compared to other online channels.

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Like that's changing as well that's probably the what we are inheriting from

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the pandemic experience where virtual events like even if they're going down

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some things have changed forever.

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Like you know we're talking about asynchronous consumption of this live event

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for example how it's going to be probably more important.

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That's a new event format per se that's extending the life cycle and so virtual

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events do play a role in sort of bringing down the costs creating more touch

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points and offering a lot but also look at this stat here

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I'm very excited about this this is flash as part of GTM partners which I'm

6:59

sure you know very well.

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What they're doing on the event led is very interesting on their plan together

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some data actually makes a ton of sense like three times the pipeline, like you

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know from events compared to other channels.

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Ten times the ROI of have in at in these versus not at in these for your

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customers.

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This is a big deal like I was listening I was preparing my interview to Jason

7:29

Lamkin the founder of Saster and I was listening to a podcast and he was saying

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anecdotally I went tech 40% of the pipeline sometimes is that that big event

7:34

that is happening.

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I mean we have IMX coming up for the events industry in a couple of weeks and a

7:40

few weeks, October 16.

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And you know I can tell it's going to be 40 if not more of the pipeline of the

7:47

event companies that are going to be there this is like the event you attend.

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So I'm going to pause there and let you, you know, if you have any comments

7:56

about this or if not I can move on to the next, next lights.

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So that's now about how to do it across the customer journey in an integrated

8:05

unified way.

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So there are different types of events experiences that are both online and in

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person that match to where the businesses from a maturity standpoint, right,

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because if you're a small business you're not going to try to pull off

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something like inbound

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course, you know, Saster's event, but you can still actually partner with that

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event in a variety of different ways as a way to either create brand awareness,

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get to pipeline accelerate pipeline educate customer strength and customer

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relationship

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So it's all about designing an event strategy that is both pre sale and post

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sale and don't think it just pipeline is new business pipeline either.

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We saw a tremendous amount of expansion pipeline come from our events as well.

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Absolutely.

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I just recently closed double digit thousands of dollars of business from

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existing clients just by attending an event.

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Obviously what what it means to sometimes that you got to have a plan when it

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goes gets to events.

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Like you don't have to be carried out on the partying side on just showing up

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and do things will talk about that as well.

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But like the strategic approach this event is about strategy. So I want to

9:16

share that with you some macro factors here that I want to share with you.

9:21

You know, AI, I think like whenever I see this on LinkedIn, this resonates so

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much with my audience the LinkedIn is becoming my sort of go to feedback for

9:30

trends, whatever, you know what's going on we got, you know, almost six million

9:36

views in the last year on my content

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and I've got so many data data points in terms of like what event planners like

9:43

whenever I see this this resonates so much.

9:46

I think of my theory here my thesis what I said yesterday to investment bankers

9:51

while at a meeting.

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I said, who's going to download a 50 page white paper in six months time.

9:58

Like who's got the time for that in the AI world first for two reasons first I

10:02

can ask AI for better answers really literally instead of like reading through,

10:07

you know, a Bible of whatever you put together.

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Secondly, who tells me that's authentic information that you source instead of

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like, you know, some chat GPT generated sort of white paper that literally

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wastes my time.

10:19

And so events become the most human sort of personable way of marketing

10:24

products and in general, I would say it's the channel that we trust.

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And like, you know, you cannot fake this even this like probably you will be

10:35

able to fake this you will have any I generated presenter in virtual events,

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but like in live events like you see the person.

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That's where can it curse here.

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That's when you're like, you know, when you cut the BS, okay, I'm going to

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censor that a little bit you cut the BS and like if you're faking it with chat

10:52

GPT online, you cannot fake it offline.

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Like, you know, they get a feel you get a feeling from a brand. And so we see

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that a lot of the pipeline may start online but actually closes at events.

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Like, you know, that's where things happen for the most cases I'm noticing that

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again and again, obviously there's stuff like, you know, the cuckoo less future

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and so first party data, you know, I don't have to tell you that like how

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important that is in that mentality

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how owning that data of like people that registered your virtual events in

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person events like the quality of that data. Like you start having like so many

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data points like people respond to polls, people that download a brochure.

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So you know, you start having like full data sets and like if you're good with

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it. Like, you know, the possibilities are endless. Like, if you have a data

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driven mentality so very excited about that.

11:43

And I want to share with you I'm going to pause here to see if there's any

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comments.

11:47

Yeah, any questions folks like just come off mute or put the chat, but like for

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me, events are centered gravity now. Most B2B marketers have not thought about

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an event as a center of gravity, because it is content.

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It is conversations. It's connection.

12:01

So if you really think through to your point, Julie, what a plan. And for me, I

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made the mistake early on in my career where I didn't do enough, whatever

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called briefs briefs for content briefs for events briefs for product launches.

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But if you build a brief and hone in on the who the why the what and the how,

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the where and the when, of course, you need to know the where and the when, but

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like those four things to start with and you really dig into how you want to

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design the overall event.

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And what you want to have happened before during and after the event. You can

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get so much of that one plus one equals three type of magic.

12:34

Oh my god, I have a full slide about that. I have my seven P's. I want to take

12:38

you through the seven P's very quickly. I mean, there's lights you got to be

12:42

able to download and double click on those if you want to.

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But like I want to take you through that process like what it means today.

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Another word about own data, by the way, you know, we submit data voluntarily

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to attend events. There's a formal component that is like comparable probably

13:00

to obtain a PDF online right now.

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And a very basis like of the Maslow hierarchy of needs. There's a obtaining a

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PDF. And then there's like, you know, R. S. V. P. for an event. So I feel that

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this dynamic is very unique to events.

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Like only when like you want to attend not only you're giving your data, you're

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paying your like you think about user conferences. Sometimes you're paying like

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$1,000 to be there to give your data to someone else like that's unprecedented

13:32

in marketing. You know, if you think about it like, what are you going to pay for? Like not

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all events are the same. Some events like obviously you're calm to or you're

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actually expensed to be there.

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But like, you know, it's interesting how if you think about the biggest event

13:44

companies right now. These are three people want to introduce you to like this

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is dog M's Lee. This is the CEO of Tarsus.

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Huge media slash events company that got acquired by informal for $1 billion.

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And he said they acquired us for our data, not for our events for data.

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That's in King Paul Miller CEO of Quest X hundreds of millions of revenue. You

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know, they launched the show in six months because of data.

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The guy on the right hand side, Anil Agarwal, the founder of money 2020 shop

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talk and healthy is that exits for $800 million. He said, events are the

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easiest, easiest market to get into. There's no barriers.

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You're like literally so easy to make anything better if you use the data right

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. Like, you know, if you think about it, like bad coffee conversations you want

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to do the one I hear, you know, pitches from sponsors so easy to do better than

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that. So easy. I just think about it. Like, what can you do about that? So I'm going

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to skip through the slides very quickly. So I feel like that.

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That's what makes the van special, like the co-creation, the high engagement,

14:55

the highest sales impact. Sometimes where you're listening to a session, even

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if you're looking at your phone while speaker is going on with their keynote.

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Like you're literally like thinking about stuff in a different way. You're not

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at your high in your house. You're a different environment. So in person is

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definitely the channel that I prefer is the channel that, you know, I'm

15:15

dedicated to at all.

15:16

You add hope in a was VP of marketing for the in person business, not for the

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online. So, you know, that's, that's where I come from. And then so that's,

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that's what I dedicate myself to.

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I want to show you some of the events, tie event types that you can think of

15:31

for an event led growth framework with some event types and KPIs you can

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quickly implement depending on the stage where you're at.

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So, you know, obviously these are the, you know, they're oversimplifying here.

15:43

Obviously, guys, I mean, we, we can be super detailed with this. I'm sure. And

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all the, all the calls you do every month, you know, there's going to be a ton

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of details, more detail here.

15:53

Like, let's look at awareness. My favorite ones are webinars in the awareness.

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And by the way, use this later on. This is a reference for you. I'm not going

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to read bullet points here.

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Like, you know, webinars for sure right now. That's what virtual events went

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back to, to be honest, like, that's what the excitement is all about. I was at

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Saster and there was an event tech company, very well known, you know,

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exhibiting there, you know, and their, their call to action was webinars.

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Right. So, there's no three days virtual events anymore. Like what we're doing

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here, like an hour super, super fun, super cool.

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So, three people discussing quick conversation. So, there's a ton of things

16:32

that you can do. Right. If we, if we continue to move on, and we go to the

16:36

consideration stage.

16:38

I feel workshops, whatever it's send, ends on, like right now, you know, with

16:43

your product, there's some more data on GTM. They said, whenever you bring your

16:48

user on a user conference, you get them to play with the product.

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Like the impact on that on the pipeline is massive, like the usage of the

16:55

product goes up, the engagement goes up, like the real consideration for your

16:59

product goes up.

17:01

So, workshops, horizontal, get the people together, forget about like, you know

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, getting whatever, you know, top speaker that we've seen a ton of times.

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We don't have time for that anymore. All the content is available online. We

17:15

don't need to see content again in a shorter messy format in person.

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So, you have to think, how am I going to use Mark and Nick, if I have them

17:26

available at inbound, right. What am I going to do with that? And I'm just

17:31

going to get Mark to do a presentation on people led growth.

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I mean, no, because like he's talked about that in a ton of, you know, podcasts

17:41

before I can download a three hour deep dive on that. I don't need that.

17:45

But if we have a three way conversation on it and ask me anything session, a

17:49

workshop collaborative workshop on the topic, you know, a human led approach to

17:54

marketing all of a sudden becomes something meaningful to you.

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So, you know, that's that's when things started to change. And so, horizontal

18:03

consideration in that, I'm going to move to the next stage unless you want to

18:08

break up exclusive VIP events.

18:10

By the way, I've got examples for you at each of these stage of like how big

18:13

tech companies and non tech companies are doing this.

18:17

So I want to show you those at the end of this presentation as well. Like

18:20

exclusive VIP events like that's the name of the game of ABM right now. Like if

18:24

you're doing ABM marketing honestly.

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That's what it revolves around now obviously if we're talking about getting

18:31

people in a steak house in San Francisco during dreamforce there's a million

18:35

people doing the same thing so you got to be creative with like how you ABM

18:39

them.

18:40

Right. And how you get them together. So it's going to be an exclusive dinner

18:44

with Mark and Nick, you know, being close to that sorry if I pick you up as an

18:48

example here, but like, you know, it's very easy for people to relate to this

18:51

right so get them together and discuss

18:54

that. So it's going to be easy relaxed environment. I see a question here. So,

18:58

you know, read it out to me because I'm focusing on the slides. So feel free to

19:02

interrupt me there.

19:04

But like, you know, I feel these sort of VIP events. That's where the game is

19:09

at. You know, sales acceleration events, these field transactional. But

19:14

honestly, like if people care about your product, they're not.

19:17

They want that information and they want it from people. Like I'm literally out

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of like dealing with customer service online right now for like five hours this

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morning.

19:27

I want to talk to people like right now. If you do in person, the impact of

19:31

that on a decision making is like so important. Right. So try to do that.

19:36

On the retention side, and then I'm going to pause after this. Reengagement

19:46

events. I don't think a lot of people do this. But like, you know, whenever you

19:46

think you're lost, you know, you're churning away, like reengaging with people

19:49

by means of events.

19:50

Oh my God. So powerful. It's like a reconnection email of some sorts that you

19:54

can automate by ops, but it's not like come to our event and reconnect with us.

19:59

We'd love to chat to you and see what you're up to today.

20:02

Oh my God. I've seen people that hate some event that companies all of a sudden

20:08

they get invited to a summer party. You know, even if they're not using them,

20:13

they become sort of evangelists online the next day and telling you like how

20:18

they loved everything and like how

20:21

do we all platforms do these type of things today. Like you can believe like

20:26

the amount of like shifting patterns that they see and where events what role

20:30

events play.

20:32

Just like think about the dynamic is not only a one way dynamic. There's also

20:36

peers. And so if you can buy their room with like enthusiast customers, all of

20:41

a sudden you have a room that is pulling pressure on your churned users.

20:47

So if you feel the pressure that they're missing out on a cold product me

20:50

probably didn't see it right. So this is like just focusing on the reengagement

20:54

but in general mixing your prospects with your customers.

20:58

You know they're doing the work for you. I mean like you don't have to do

21:01

anything right you just have to create the space for people to meet right. So I

21:05

'm going to pause that.

21:06

So there are two questions one is from both on VJ but there's one about the

21:10

data side and maybe we wait to this because I know you're going to come to it

21:14

around talent. Like can can companies actually activate the data side of things

21:20

, or is there just a gap in

21:21

talent. I have a very strong point of view. So if you want me to go first

21:24

Julius feel like please go ahead. Yeah. You want me to you want to answer that

21:28

now. Yes.

21:30

You want to take it now. No, no you go first. Okay. So so my my taking this VJ

21:37

and everyone else is event marketers. I'm thinking this one like a traditional

21:41

B2B business standpoint.

21:43

Aren't usually that well trained or that have that much experience and skill

21:48

sets when it comes to taking the data that their events create and enabling and

21:53

activating that data across different go to market teams within a business.

21:59

So my number one recommendation is you got to find someone either in sales

22:03

operations or revenue operations or if your business is kind of smaller,

22:07

someone who who understands just how systems are set up at your company to say

22:12

look we're doing this event.

22:14

And we in the objective goes back to the why the why we're doing this event is

22:19

we're trying to do XYZ. How can we help and work together how can you help me

22:23

and how can we work together to activate that data in these different ways.

22:28

And the questions I asked there is does the data have to be real time. Does the

22:33

data have to be sent to people and then followed up on.

22:38

Is there stuff from a data standpoint that's you know pre and post that needs

22:44

to be like extrapolated out.

22:47

But to me, if you want to take this up a notch from just like an extra like

22:51

from one event to a strategic level, you then have to ask yourself, hey,

22:56

marketing sales leader.

22:58

We believe that we're missing an opportunity to enrich the account information

23:03

and the contact information from event data. If we made that a first class

23:07

citizen and how we think about our data strategy at a company, then let's start

23:12

at that level.

23:13

Right, you might have to start worth the event level to prove out that this

23:16

data is valuable. But if you really want to operationalize this and make it a

23:19

first class citizen, you have to try to figure out a way to manage up and

23:24

influence someone in that executive leadership team.

23:26

To say, look at all this first party intent data and maybe some second party

23:30

and third party intent data that we can get that will help us find better

23:34

signals of purchase intent customer retention intent, advocacy intent, you know

23:40

, all these different types of signals that we could use to inform how we

23:46

actually create and retain revenue.

23:48

Absolutely. Such a great point, Mark, to be honest, like such a great vision

23:53

here. Let me add a couple of points here to think about.

23:57

You know, things are changing as well, right. So you don't get into events

24:01

because you love data, Mark, let's be honest and Nick, you get into events

24:06

because you love people, like you like the action and you like all of, you know

24:10

, whatever is going on at events.

24:12

You know, that's what gets you into events. And so there's a disconnect in

24:16

terms of the traditional event people, right, people that work at event

24:20

companies like, you know, venue side, traditional events industry.

24:25

But there's a new wave of people first coming in, which is like the blended

24:28

event marketers, right, that come with a strong marketing background, like

24:33

their data focused online with online experience, especially new generations of

24:37

like, you know, head of events in marketing teams

24:39

I'm super pumped about them, like their knowledge of the data frameworks, you

24:43

know, exactly what to look for. So, you know, that's a generational shift, not

24:47

not age driven, by all means.

24:50

I think it's like knowledge driven in most cases.

24:54

Then there's a second element here. So first off, the biggest loser here has

24:58

been a VENTAC for many, many years. Like, honestly, like even the platforms,

25:02

they say they do a great job.

25:04

And like, you know, looking at the marketing, don't get me started on that. I

25:09

mean, I wasted probably $3,000 of a client's budget to find UTM parameters,

25:17

sources in a screen, right, on a major platform.

25:22

Four hours of time to dig into the platform to find like referral sources for

25:27

ticket sales. Come on, like, you know, this is the basics, you know, so don't

25:32

get me started on that.

25:34

I mean, I'm kind of like, you know, VENTAC has been failing, but that's

25:37

changing. That's the good news. Because why, why because of co pilots and AI, I

25:43

feel like that's going to be a game changer for an event.

25:46

And like, you've never been able to grasp what to do with data, the ability to

25:50

even like download a framework that you found on LinkedIn.

25:54

Like, you know, the questions that you need to ask yourself and like, ask them

25:58

to chat GPT or like to your co pilot within the event tech platform,

26:02

downloading all the Excels, spreadsheets, right, upload them to a platform that

26:07

tells you insights about these data.

26:11

I mean, this is like what companies do in the events industry, there are

26:13

specific companies, they're analytics companies for the events industry. This

26:17

is what they do. You give them the road, the raw data, they come back with a

26:21

presentation with the insights.

26:23

That's going to be available for you very, very soon, if not right now, right?

26:26

So you can already do that in terms of like, say, for example, thinking how,

26:33

okay, target all the users in the Bay Area that attended my previous virtual

26:38

events and

26:39

everywhere at 85% or more engagement levels and create an email sequence to

26:45

invite them to my in person gathering and, you know, monitor that and then do

26:51

follow ups and like, you know, mark them in the in the CRM like this is a basic

26:57

sort of, you know, I'm riffing with you here type of implementation that you

27:01

can do. You can think of like expanding that. Think about all the people that submitted

27:05

a feedback form from an event with like score of 90 or plus and activate them

27:10

to attend this other event. There's going to be one of the types of events that

27:15

we did to actually

27:16

get to convince people not to churn. So it's like you see how you can

27:19

immediately cross reference data points. You have a ton of data here available

27:23

to cross reference and this is like so great.

27:27

Like this is like literally the holy grail of data. If you're a data person,

27:31

like, you know, events are going to be your, I'm literally working on a project

27:35

where they came to us at Vaux Puss, just to create a data framework for their

27:40

next events and like what do they need to measure

27:42

and like how do they need to act after that. But let's get it practical for you

27:45

guys. These are my seven Ps that I want you to look at, right, planning an

27:49

event. Okay, good.

27:52

Does anybody do like do anybody can plan an event? No. Okay. So think about

27:57

that. Like, you know, not anybody can be an event planner. Okay, so be always

28:01

conscious of that.

28:03

But from a strategic perspective, you got to be aware of what goes on in an

28:06

event, right. You need to always hire someone, like practical logistics, you

28:11

know, there's safety of people involved.

28:13

So you got to take care of that right when we're dealing with humans. Like, you

28:16

know, there's all that things that you got to take care of, right. So think

28:20

about that.

28:21

But sad that you got to talk, we got to talk about the seven Ps, right.

28:26

And it's the place, the people, the public, the promotion, the performers, you

28:30

know, what did I miss? The purpose obviously the objective, sorry, it's beyond

28:34

my camera. I couldn't see it.

28:36

So, you know, I feel that, you know, these tips are going to be helpful for you

28:42

as a follow up. You can double click on these. Like, you implement 10% of this.

28:48

Your event is going to be 100% better already.

28:51

So, like, most events don't think about this. I know I love this. I, maybe you

28:55

have it in a different one. I just have to read it a little bit more careful.

29:00

But like, the purpose to me, one that you could add to this is what is the

29:03

reason why someone would sign up, show up, engage, and then ultimately

29:08

recommend the event.

29:09

There's always those two why's there's the why for the business, the objective

29:11

for the business, right. What are you trying to do? How do you quantify the

29:14

objective? But then what's the purpose for attendees and the people who get to

29:18

experience it together.

29:20

Oh my God, like, you know, and that's not an easy question. Why? Because events

29:24

are exploding right now. That's a great thing. Like, there's a ton of events

29:28

happening. That means also competition.

29:31

So, if your event is not showing up for the right reasons, like, you know, don

29:34

't assume that people are going to show up, especially if your event is free and

29:38

like in marketing, you tend to do a lot of free events because you want to get

29:43

people through the door and good leads.

29:44

I mean, no show rates are insane. We're triple booking sometime. Like, you know

29:49

, we're tripling the capacity, you know, for actual show up rates. We're

29:54

thinking like one out of three is going to show up.

29:57

So that you got to keep that in mind. It's like, it's beautiful. The world of

30:01

events is amazing, but it's brutal as well. Like the type of feedback that you

30:05

get when your event is not well thought.

30:08

And what does it mean? Well thought, it means like it's speaking to me, right?

30:12

It's speaking to me for my top reasons. I want to take you through the reasons

30:16

why.

30:17

Okay, I have five slides on the reasons why we attend and what you should do

30:21

about that.

30:23

Let me give you one more P though that you might want to add. Partners.

30:29

I love that. That's going to be the eight P's. So true. Oh my god. What a miss.

30:34

Oh, I feel so bad. A little bit of depression right now. Like I thought about

30:38

this.

30:39

You can't use the five P's and then became the seven. Like this has been going

30:43

for like six years, but now this is not something I started last week.

30:47

So I feel so depressed right now. Thank you Mark.

30:50

That's all good. No, that's true. Partners. So key. Partners means like other

30:54

companies that are non-competitive that you can integrate and partner with to

30:57

do your events at.

30:59

Like think about Dreamforce, get people together, do a satellite event and

31:03

dream. Honestly, I see some people. I was talking to this very high profile

31:07

investment bankers group.

31:10

And they were like, yeah, I mean, we don't go to Dreamforce, but we do plan our

31:13

events around it. Or we do attend our events around it.

31:18

Like, you know, so people are not going to the 15,000 conference anymore

31:22

because it's probably too confusing to my especially high profile decision

31:27

makers.

31:28

But like if you combine your energy with someone else and you create a

31:32

satellite event, oh my god. People are desperate for that because events

31:37

usually big events, they do a very poor job in sort of creating, curating the

31:41

experience for someone.

31:42

I tried to attend South by Southwest. It's a nightmare. Right. It's like six

31:46

hotels, a million events, 10,000 sessions. Like, what are you going to do? It's

31:51

like too much to even fatten that. Okay, so I'm going to move on to my event

31:57

registration levers.

31:58

This is hot of the press, very fresh for you. If you caught my newsletter

32:02

subscription today, like my email, I also gave the KPI. Yeah, too. You can

32:07

think of for every registration lever.

32:10

And this is like specifically for you to boost your registration, right? So

32:14

your question, right? The purpose. Like, how do we get people to get to come to

32:17

the event? First off, belonging.

32:20

We want to belong to someone. There's something. There's a need of community

32:24

connection, inclusion, acceptance. We want to be heard. There's a whole

32:29

movement about events about new or divergent way of learning.

32:34

You know, there's a inclusion, you know, you can feel recognized when you feel

32:37

like you're community, we're connecting with your community. You want to feel

32:41

identified.

32:42

And so how do you do that? Like, in your messaging, you prioritize all of those

32:45

opportunities. Like, if you know people just care about the community. You're

32:50

not promoting a keynote speaker. Nobody cares about that.

32:53

You know what I mean? So that means you're above the fold on your website has

32:56

to be about the community, the people that you're going to meet, the

32:59

appointments that you're going to make.

33:02

So you got to make it tangible for me. Like, what am I going to get? Because

33:05

like, that's my primary objective, my primary need to come to your event. So

33:10

you got to be in tune with your audience, right? And I'm going to make an

33:14

example of a client we work with very quickly on the next lever.

33:19

So individual, this is going on, like so much right now. Like, I'm attending

33:24

for my own purpose, like for myself. I want to gain something out of this. I

33:30

want to self promote myself. I want to get a bit better status. I want to meet

33:35

people. Like, I want to create FOMO in other people watching this. Like, it's only for

33:40

me, right? So you create like strong social media. You got to create like what

33:46

's in it for me, right? You got to show me how I'm going to feel part of

33:52

something exclusive, for example, right, where nobody else can be part of.

33:57

I know you've done sort of exclusive, creative, driven, Nick type of events,

34:01

where it's like kind of very secluded, only for myself, for my betterment. And

34:06

so this is more the personal one. We cannot deny this.

34:10

We cannot say that all the people like they're just there to be connected and

34:13

be part of like some people don't care. They just want to self promote

34:16

themselves. And that's it. You know, that's what I want to do. Right?

34:19

Emotion, very important one. So this is an important one that happened for my

34:24

client. So we're talking about tech audiences here, user conference for Big Big

34:29

Big Client. And they were like tracking low on registrations.

34:34

I go on their website. I see all these tech conferences. Honestly, if you look

34:37

at the competition, everybody's marketing experiences. Everybody's marketing

34:42

like, you know, the destination where you're going and the activities you can

34:47

do.

34:48

And they were like so heavy on the content. They couldn't care less. Obviously,

34:53

the audience was like, I do not need more content. I have all the content that

34:57

I need online, especially for tech people, right? Very online friendly.

35:01

You're not going to come to your event to listen to someone. They already

35:04

listened to everyone. So you make it about Vegas. Make it about San Francisco.

35:11

San Francisco is a little bit challenging right now as a destination. I would

35:14

say make it about Miami.

35:15

Make it about like, you know, pick a destination where people are going to be

35:18

excited to go to, right? Do it in a Bermuda. Do it somewhere that is cool.

35:23

You know, market the activities, the experiences that you're going to do more

35:27

than the content, right? If you think about the transaction, then you have

35:31

people that just want to better deals. They want to close business.

35:35

They have to justify the expenses to the boss, right? So you got to work on

35:40

stuff like, let me buy packets of meetings. All I got, like, a new arga wall,

35:46

like he built shop talk on the basis of that, the ability to book meetings with

35:52

buyers, right?

35:53

IMAX, you know, this show we're going to, they have 4,000 hosted buyers,

35:57

meaning if you show up to IMAX, there's going to be 4,000 people there. They're

36:02

just buy, right? So the transactional impact of that.

36:06

So important, more important than anything else that you can think of. Like, I

36:10

'm not going to care about the community and all that. No, I'm there to close

36:15

business.

36:16

And we need that way more, right? Final one, education. In some sectors, you

36:21

can give credits, you know, whatever it is, like continuing education credits.

36:26

This is very important for some people to actually come to your certification

36:30

training.

36:31

That's a big motivator, especially if you have like a hefty price, you know, $1

36:35

,500 to attend your user conference. You got to give me some some training on

36:40

your platform, for example, right? So that's a good one.

36:45

So, yeah, now I'm going to pause there. I have some examples for you. And, you

36:50

know, I don't know if you have any questions or comments about this.

36:57

I'm curious how you. Oh, good. I was just going to ask. So I think all five of

37:02

these are obviously great value props for different cohorts of the population

37:07

that visit the event.

37:09

How are you working with clients to perhaps gain an understanding up front in

37:13

the discovery phase of maybe what that breakout of those cohorts are and how to

37:18

prioritize that.

37:20

Find out the messaging accordingly on say the event landing page. Yeah. So

37:26

there's so much information only when there's an online environment that

37:32

supports the event. So if you're not committed to online content, I believe

37:38

that's that like you're digging yourself a grave for in person events like

37:42

honestly,

37:43

every single client that I work with specifically big events like trade shows

37:47

and exhibitions. I'm telling you, I tell them you're in the media business. You

37:53

got to move into online content.

37:55

You got to post 10 times a day on social media. Why? Because you're testing

37:58

your message all the time. You're getting you're getting feedback about what's

38:03

resonating with your audience again and again.

38:06

And so that decision in terms of what's going to resonate more become so

38:10

obvious because you have a constant online community to deal with and to check

38:15

with and like to kind of get the feedback off.

38:19

Right. Sometimes in platforms you have that some platforms have a 365 day type

38:24

of engagement where you do all your webinars every time and you have the

38:28

different data of those webinars and the people can connect them and network

38:32

with each other.

38:33

So you can have in a closed environment like that. You can have an open

38:37

environment such as social right. So start like jotting down ideas like we're

38:42

thinking about three destinations. Is it going to be Vegas Nashville or Miami

38:47

both

38:48

or all of a sudden you got the like you know you're engaging the audience. You

38:52

're getting you're going to be open of course to do something like that. You're

38:56

not open like you know to something like that you're not going to get traction

39:00

in this day and age is not going to happen for you.

39:02

You're not going to have data points of your online content is not going to

39:05

happen for you. I'm sorry. Like the contextual importance of that, especially

39:10

for your content. If you think about your content Kyle, like how do you select

39:13

your content for your event.

39:15

Like usually the process like what should we invite. Who's cool right now. Who

39:19

's trending. I was that reflecting the needs of your audience right. Why on the

39:24

other hand if you have like a constant content program social media program,

39:29

you know exactly what type of content is resonating with your audience.

39:32

You're going to find a better speaker for that or you know company employees

39:36

that can deliver on that type of content. You don't need to hire speakers

39:40

sometimes you just need to put people in a room right.

39:43

So I feel the more contextual you are about your online effort. The more you

39:48

have in terms of data to act upon. I don't know if that answers your question

39:52

then there's like a case by case scenario.

39:55

What didn't work at your previous events I look at that as well right what

39:58

happened at your previous events what was resonating what's your competition

40:02

doing you always have to keep an eye.

40:04

Right. I always tell like you know one of the tips that I shared in my

40:07

newsletter today is like head to your competitor website. Download the schedule

40:12

upload to chat GPT.

40:13

Give me insights about their content program right now. I mean you immediately

40:15

have like a panoramic view of like what they're doing and like what's reson

40:16

ating with that specific virtual for that specific vertical so very, very

40:26

important right.

40:27

One thing I want to mention to you guys I counted one event tower what what we

40:32

're doing right now on average 121 insights. Okay, we generate.

40:37

If you think about it like if that's really well curated like we're doing here

40:41

like I'm adding Marcus adding Kyle is asking like we're engaging and creating

40:46

so many insights so many more than a presentation.

40:49

So the biggest missed opportunity of events today is like content is what you

40:53

do with the content. If you think about events is probably one of the most

40:58

unsustainable industries out there we create a lot of waste.

41:03

A lot of travel, you know a lot of like you know we have to deal with that

41:07

sustainability is a big issue but the biggest waste by all means its content.

41:12

You know the amount of content we generate and then it goes to waste and it's

41:16

just left somewhere it's incredible so this is my event led engine.

41:20

I feel like you can take record whatever you think about like the next thing

41:25

you're going to do whatever it is record the hell out of it.

41:30

Do like you know if you don't do the recording you're setting yourself up for

41:33

failure so there's one thing you're going to remember from this presentation is

41:37

that you got to record record like if you have AV in place for your in person

41:41

event.

41:42

You already set up for recording right they have audio jacks like you don't

41:46

need video like if you have video grade but even audio by itself it's enough

41:51

you can transcript that make it become like obviously the recording becomes

41:55

short video long video form you know replace

41:59

webinar live webinar replays you know which is a thing right now where you mim

42:03

icking a live webinar that is not a live webinar.

42:06

So there's a YouTube shorts, TikTok, transcript, blog posts, LinkedIn posts and

42:11

this is done automatically by some platforms by the way, you know there's

42:18

platforms like gloss gloss gl O SS.ai where you just upload the video you get

42:23

already like chunked out in like four different like short videos

42:28

and all different formats, transcript for LinkedIn, audio podcast, visual you

42:33

can do visuals with the content you know graphics you can do so much with it so

42:40

do not waste that content.

42:43

Okay, I'm going to close with KPIs and examples do you have any questions so

42:48

far, are we doing.

42:50

There's just one more from Vijay like about like how do tech companies get so

42:54

good at building these bigger events.

42:57

I mean he calls our dream force inbound and then there's other industries that

43:01

aren't good at it especially in Asia. He mentions.

43:06

What are the big flagship events I guess. Yeah I mean that's first off they

43:11

haven't been built in a day took decades to do that like you know even a saster

43:16

if you think about it like it's 10 years you know to get to 12,000 people.

43:22

So this is not an easy serve day obviously if you have momentum momentum is

43:26

very important right sometimes you you trying to find case studies in companies

43:31

that have an extreme momentum.

43:34

You cannot you cannot do that like Figma everybody loves Figma everybody's

43:38

using Figma obviously you have 20,000 people that want to attend online and

43:43

most consenter capacity because people like not be contained.

43:48

Like you know what I mean like there's so much energy and momentum in that like

43:53

how do you going to recreate that well I mean this is like it's one is one

43:57

trillion dollar question to create that momentum.

44:01

Because like it's a combination of product that is amazing community that is

44:05

well nurtured. So it's such a combination of elements that is like almost

44:10

impossible to be honest to concentrate on KPI is like that it's like the ideas

44:16

is that you gotta be able to get

44:18

in for the long term you gotta be able to build something that makes sense at

44:21

that moment in time for your audience and build on top of it with the feedback

44:25

that you get from them.

44:27

Right, because if you think about saster it started as a meet up for like 500

44:31

people right informally then you gotta be able to build a business on top of it

44:35

or like a movement on top of it that makes sense right.

44:39

So let's talk about the KPI isn't data for that. You know look at these items I

44:44

left them here for you to double click and go back later.

44:47

Like these are the things that we're looking at right.

44:50

And this is like the why why it provides you know take a type registration

44:54

social media content generated that's the awareness overall registration ticket

44:59

sales, the consideration part like we're getting deeper.

45:03

So you're looking at the content viewed the session registration if you showed

45:08

up for a session or not the con the comments in a session the chat interaction.

45:14

That means more engagement right you could like literally have an engagement

45:19

pyramid year and it would you know exactly be the same right.

45:23

So you're more engaged you are the more you move down the funnel the more the

45:27

metrics become more intimate right number of connections made if you sure no

45:31

show how many meetings you booked like now I'm considering right.

45:36

Did I repeat consideration into two slides. No I didn't. Yes I did. Sorry about

45:40

that. I think I repeated. Oh no this is continued by the one before the

45:44

decision I wanted to make through that.

45:47

SQL spline food traffic both visits right we're talking about closing business

45:52

here.

45:53

And then retention and PS session rating right all of these beautiful you know

45:58

post acquisition type of of metrics right use this as a framework obviously

46:04

there's way more than this.

46:07

But this is like enough this is good enough like if you pull like 10% of this

46:12

your event is going to be 1000 times better I would say so think about these.

46:18

Let me show you some case studies an example awareness right the dream force

46:22

the Adobe summit the Google IO is like these are programs they're like just

46:27

done for the beauty of it like the these are like a pure awareness marketing

46:33

implementation right. It's like such a big event that you're not looking at our or any more to

46:37

a certain extent like you gotta have it you need to have it because people

46:41

expected and like you not having this like I would say if you're thinking as a

46:46

sponsor of events.

46:48

It's like not being your flagship event for your industry. I always tell my

46:54

clients in the events industry if you're not at i'm x you do not exist for a

46:59

lot of clients.

47:01

So think about that like whatever you think about it whatever your you know ABN

47:07

theory is sometimes almost all the times you need that awareness you need to be

47:13

there.

47:14

You need to show that you're human and that there's people that you're not like

47:19

some dodgy operation with offices offshore that like you nobody can relate to

47:24

like you need to show up.

47:26

I had fights with my CEO saying you gotta come to i'm x like you gotta show up

47:31

here and shake hands if you take Reggie, I go all the CEO of C event recently

47:38

being acquired about 4.6 billion dollars by Blackstone.

47:41

He shows up at every single i'm x is that the booth is there literally the

47:44

activation of the booth is there shaking hands with everybody taking selfies

47:49

taking pictures been doing it for 12 years.

47:52

Like it's crazy. So he understands very well how important it is to show up for

47:57

awareness right.

47:59

So consideration like you know the garden is symposium like you know how you do

48:05

like they're doing amaze on teams for Microsoft like this is becomes like a

48:10

little bit deeper a little bit smaller.

48:14

So you see we're moving into more engagement type is like more of a symposium

48:19

workshop type of experience the decision oh my god you look at the right hand

48:24

side gong.

48:25

You know this is my ex this Brianna hug my ex colleague hopping previously and

48:30

bright she's the field marketer for gong she does these amazing dinners like

48:36

you know with a speaker and like the top the best of the best curated audience

48:42

that you can think of

48:43

these are true networking and learning opportunities like so great. I'm I'm

48:48

going to follow Brianna I go on and like see all the events she does she's such

48:54

a master at that retention.

48:57

You see how you know you could do here like what is it this one I can see top

49:02

blow.

49:03

Sorry about that top blow is is you know doing like we engagement events with

49:08

their customer base like you know their user groups.

49:13

They come together you know to give feedback about the platform you know

49:16

checking the satisfaction about it so it's not always about prospect prospect

49:21

prospects and generating new leads right.

49:24

That's it for me my friends thank you so much for you know your your help and

49:30

being with me today. I enjoyed this so much let me put this in a in a better

49:37

screen to Julius at ball push.

49:39

I'm going to be a little bit more calm and yeah if you have any more questions.

49:48

I have a question I have a question what do you what do you think is going to

49:49

be the piece of hardware.

49:51

That's going to be most consequential two events in the next five years

49:55

hardware.

49:56

Yeah hardware physical or physical something physical.

49:59

Two things I'm excited about technology like click from visible. You know which

50:03

is like you know essentially a bracelet or use wipe you exchange information

50:08

and then you download everything after that.

50:11

I think like what the iOS 15 do download it.

50:15

Like there's the business card exchange by just NFC swiping of two phones

50:21

exchange information so key right floor floor analytics hear me out right

50:28

exhibitions.

50:30

So you have tiles that measure how many people pass by.

50:34

You know super excited about that by just the pressure on the tiles that you

50:39

put on the flooring.

50:41

And so you know how many people pass by. You know it is an awareness type of

50:45

exposure but like you know we have still have impressions they may count

50:49

something right so that exists.

50:52

And also I would say look at what Zenos is doing with their analytics.

50:59

And that's the AI sort of what they called what they call facial analysis. And

51:06

so they point a camera at you during an event.

51:10

And they're able to do analytics based on your facial expressions that gives

51:13

feedback about the content that is being proposed right.

51:17

So you have like very deep engagement type of things like that's kind of a

51:21

middleware type of solution is not purely hardware but is like camera appointed

51:26

for sure.

51:27

That's amazing one more question I'll have Nick and you wrap it up. I'm going

51:30

to you know kind of lead the witness with this one. What about spatial

51:33

computing.

51:34

Oh my god what about it and why how do you how do you mean like and what in

51:38

what sense.

51:39

Well Apple created the category.

51:41

Right.

51:42

Maybe they didn't but I'm pretty sure they did.

51:44

Yes.

51:45

And you know that's that's wrapped everything wrapped up in VR AR.

51:50

So you see as an impact in events well listen it's going to be tough it's going

51:54

to be tough because like you know whatever has been done with with Oculus you

51:58

know as it works so far so people like you know that type of experience with a

52:02

big visor on your head.

52:04

Like we cannot deny this we all know it on the back of our heads.

52:08

As long as even if it's Apple doing it which means a lot because whenever Apple

52:12

is doing something that could be a game changer you know December 2023.

52:17

That's going to be when we find out like with this mixed reality.

52:20

You know that could be potentially the game changer for the events industry or

52:26

listen up for the people that misinterpret what events are about.

52:31

If you think that events are about a checklist or logistics of throwing a venue

52:36

together.

52:37

They're not about that they're about connecting people regardless the medium

52:42

regardless you know whether it's virtual whether it's in person whether it's

52:46

mixed reality and therefore like those are very good at connecting people.

52:51

They're going to be they're going to be having an edge whatever the tool and

52:55

like there's going to be new sets of events bring it on like you know we're

53:00

just going to apply our you know our best practices to that type of environment

53:06

so we'll see we'll see the adoption is going to be important.

53:10

Thank you, Joyce. Hey, incredible. Thank you so much Julius. This was fantastic

53:16

We'll make sure to share the recording with everyone. If you have any questions

53:20

Julius's email as you can see on the screen Julius that bold push calm.

53:25

Reach out to him. He's very helpful. He's not afraid to talk to you as well.

53:30

He talks to me quite often which is very nice of him so.

53:34

Julius, thank you again this was fantastic I learned a ton I'm sure everyone

53:38

listening learned a ton and hopefully we'll see you all next time.

53:42

Thank you.

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